Are You Ready for Hunting Season?

Hello Bass Pro Shops Customers! Are you doing last minute shopping for this year’s hunting season? Listed below are some checklists you need to be looking over to make sure have everything you need this cold hunting season.

 

Preseason Checklist

Purchase hunting licenses

Secure landowners permission

Take hunter safety courses

Preseason scouting

Get physically fit

Sight-in rifle

Schedule vacation time

Vehicle maintenance

Camp repair

Purchase or reload ammunition

 

Clothing Checklist

Check weather report for proper dress

Hat (Be sure it has the required amount  of fluorescent orange)

Coat 

Jacket

Vest

Pants

Shirts 

Sweater

Boots

Extra socks

Rain Gear 

Face Mask

Field Gear and Accessories

Knife sharpened

Flashlight and batteries

Drag rope

License and holder

Pencil string or plastic tie down for tagging

Field dressing kit

Compass

Masking scents

Deer/Turkey calls

Water bottle

Thermos

   

First-Aid kit

Whistle

Hunter's seat cushion

Tree stand (with safety belt)

Hand warmers

Daypack with lunch and snacks

 

Personal Checkpoints

Prescription medicine

Wallet with ID money and credit cards

Keys to camp, gun cabinet, and extra vehicle keys

Leave details of your hunting itinerary with your family

Cellular phone if possible

 

After the Hunt

Mail in harvest report card (if you got lucky!)

Process deer, turkey, etc.

Taxidermy arrangements (hope you saved some money!)

Clean and store all your gear

If you hunted on private property share you harvest with the landowner and send the landowner a thank-you note.

 

A few Other Things to Check....

Don’t wait until the night before the season opens to start gathering all your hunting gear. Here’s a look at how to avoid first-day glitches that could cost you a shot.

We’ve all done it at one time or another: It’s the day before deer season and you’ve waited until the last minute to round up all the gear you’ll need for tomorrow’s hunt. You’re nearly in a panic as you go through a mental checklist while you rummage through closets, attics and the garage.

You fill the pockets of your hunting coat and your daypack with everything you think you’ll need for the next day, dust off your favorite tack-driver, and pile everything by the back door. The next morning, you’re halfway to your stand before you realize you’ve forgotten some essential item – a facemask, gloves or even ammunition!

Forgetfulness and haste have probably saved the lives of more game animals than just about any other hunter’s gaffe you can think of. Perhaps the most frustrating part is that most of these glitches are preventable. What follows is a rundown of essential and non-essential items to help you avoid the pitfalls of poor preparation this opening day.

Batteries

Its opening morning and you head off down that long trail through the woods to your stand. Halfway there you notice your flashlight beam seems to be growing dimmer. At first you think it’s just your imagination, but before long the light fizzles, and though you’re only a few hundred yards from your stand, you might as well be a mile away. You won’t find it now until the sun comes up.

Dead batteries top the list of common opening-day glitches. Deer hunters have come to rely on a number of battery-operated devices, including flashlights, range finders, hand-held GPS units and two-way radios, to name a few. We love them when they work, but curse them when they don’t, even though it’s usually our own fault.

A little preventive maintenance can save a lot of frustration. Always check every battery-operated tool before the season opens. Test each device to see if it works. If you have a battery tester, use it. If you don’t, get one. One alternative is to buy batteries with built-in strength indicators. And remember this simple rule: When in doubt, throw them out. Batteries are cheap. It also doesn’t hurt to keep spare batteries in your pack, just in case.

Guns and Bows

“It shot fine last year when I put it away” is a common lament heard at deer camps all around the country, usually after opening day misses. This is one of the most common blunders hunters make. There are hundreds of reasons why your gun or bow’s point of aim could change between seasons. Maybe you, or someone else, bumped it unknowingly. A different bullet weight, a different brand, even a different batch of ammunition could make a difference. Maybe you left too much oil in the barrel when you cleaned it. Or maybe you didn’t clean it and a drop of water turned the fine grooves inside your barrel into a spot of rust.

Leave nothing to chance. Make sure all the moving parts are in working order. Clean off the heavy coat of oil you applied for storage and replace it with a fine coating of synthetic lube that won’t freeze or gum up. Next, check all screws for tightness, especially on scope mounts and rings. Finally, take it to the range and fire it, using whatever ammunition you’ll be hunting with. Shoot enough to make sure your point of impact is correct and consistent.

If you’re bow hunting, sight pins can come out of alignment. Check all cams to make sure they’re turning freely and lubricate any moving parts that might make noise with a scent-free lube. When you’re done sighting in with field points, shoot a few broad heads to make sure your bow is still on. (Broad heads will often shoot differently than field tips, and this is a common source of “pilot error.”)

A Miscellany of Other Items

Whether you stuff them in your pockets, hang them off your belt or put them in a daypack, there’s an endless list of miscellaneous items you can take into the woods. Some are necessary; others merely make your endeavor more comfortable or efficient. First, let’s take a look at the essentials.

If I had to pick one item from my daypack that I would never be without, it would have to be a compass. You may be very familiar with the area you hunt and only headed out for an hour or two, but what if you decide to pick up a hot track on your way in, or end up following a long blood trail? Good outdoorsmen never get “lost,” but they sometimes get turned around. A compass will help you find the shortest route to get in and out of the woods. You can also use it to take a bearing on an animal’s direction after the shot and while tracking to help in recovery.

Obviously, you’ll need field-dressing supplies that are in good condition, particularly a sharp knife. I recall one opening morning when I was not so well prepared. I made a good shot and found the fallen buck easily, but my elation quickly turned to frustration when I realized I’d forgotten my knife.

I only made that mistake once, but I’d need all of my scarred fingers to count the number of times I’ve field dressed a deer with a dull knife. I now carry two knives, and I sharpen them before the season and after every use.

Other field-dressing supplies you may want to include are rubber gloves, a small length of cord to tie-off innards or attach your tag, and a small sealable plastic bag with some moist wipes for cleaning up your hands.

The list of what could be considered non-essential gear is limited only by your own needs or desires. Binoculars and range finders are particularly helpful in locating and judging game and accurately estimating distances.

Many hunters now use scents and calls to help draw game closer. You may need a saw for limbing or boning. If you’re a tree-stand hunter, you’ll need a rope to haul your bow or gun up with and something to hang them on.

You may want to include some sort of wind-checking device, such as a bottle of fine powder or tufts of silk.

Two items that could arguably be considered essential are a water bottle and a survival kit. Under moderate conditions water will help quench your thirst and in hot weather it will keep you hydrated. A survival kit is an insurance policy you hope you’ll never need. But if you do have a need for one at some point, it’s nice to have it.

LICENSES

A hunting license is one of those things you should take care of well before the season begins, particularly if you’re traveling out of state. Every state has different license sales procedures. Some may require you to purchase your hunting license from your local town office, which may only be open Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1-4 p.m. Others require that you apply by mail, which could take several weeks, provided nothing gets lost in transit. Even if the local license vendor is just around the corner and open 24 hours a day, leave nothing to chance. He could run out of licenses, particularly as it gets closer to opening day.

CHECK THE REGULATIONS

As I sat in my tree stand watching the forest slowly come to life, I waited anxiously for the first distant shots that would announce the opening of another deer season.

Thirty minutes after first light I still hadn’t heard a shot. I suddenly began to get a very uneasy feeling that maybe I’d somehow jumped the gun. I fumbled through my pack searching in vain for the rulebook that wasn’t there. It was another half hour before I finally heard the first shots that put me at ease, but that first hour was one of the least enjoyable opening mornings I’ve ever spent.

Since that day I’ve learned to take nothing for granted. Regulations often change from year to year, and though state fish and game agencies do their best to keep us informed, it is ultimately up to the hunter to know the current laws and seasons.

MAKE A CHECKLIST

Even though I always go over a mental checklist, I still manage to forget something. I finally remedied that by making a written list. That way it’s all there in black and white and I don’t have to rely on memories of last year’s hunt

 

-Rebecca

Hunting Department

Leeds Alabama

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Six Simple Tips for Rifle Sight-In

Six Simple Tips for Rifle Sight-In

written by Ray Sasser

For most hunters, getting a shot at a deer or other big-game animal is a difficult chore that requires a lot of time, money and hard work. While you cannot control the movements of a wild game animal, you must make certain that your rifle shoots where it is aimed. Here are six simple rifle sight-in tips from Jim Ridings, owner of Outback Sportsman shooting range, custom ammo and rifle business near Dallas, Texas. Ridings has sighted in literally thousands of rifles in every popular caliber.

Sighting in a rifle

1) Don't rely on bore-sighting for rifle accuracy. Many gunsmiths use a mechanical device called a collimator to approximately align the crosshairs with the rifle bore. This is usually done when a scope is mounted on the rifle. The key word here is "approximately." Bore-sighting can be very precise; it will likely be precise enough to place the bullet somewhere on the paper target at 25 yards.

One memorable Saturday morning prior to the opening of deer season, Ridings had eight hunters fire new bore-sighted rifles on his range. The most accurate of the eight rifles placed the bullet within a foot of the bull's-eye at 25 yards. To be certain where your rifle shoots, you must fire at paper targets from a solid rest.

2) Fire your first shots at 25 yards. After sighting-in virtually every caliber and bullet weight commonly used in big-game hunting, Ridings has found that most modern calibers sighted-in to shoot 3/10 of an inch low at 25 yards are about 2.5 inches high at 100 yards.

Since most deer hunters sight-in a little high at 100 yards, the 25-yard rule of thumb is a good one to remember. Because of image size and ease of precision aiming at short distances, bullet placement is much easier at 25 yards than at 100 yards.

3) Ridings uses sandbags to hold the rifle absolutely steady when sighting-in. He then fires his first shot. He leaves the rifle sandbagged in position. To save ammunition, Ridings does not sight-in in typical fashion by adjusting the crosshairs to move the point of aim toward the bull's-eye. Instead, with the rifle still solidly on the sandbags, he adjusts the scope so the crosshairs are centered on the bullet hole he just punched in the target. That means the scope is now lined up with the bore.

The second shot should be pretty near the bull's-eye. A third shot may be required to fine-tune where the bullet strikes at 25 yards. You should then fire the rifle at 100 yards. For that matter, you should also fire the rifle at the farthest distance you expect to shoot at game, just to see where it hits at longer ranges.

From a practical standpoint, long-distance shooting at paper targets emphasizes human error in precision shooting. Those 1-inch, 100-yard groups you're so proud of open up considerably at 300 yards.

4) If your rifle gets out of whack while in the field, you can bore-sight it yourself. That's assuming you shoot a bolt-action rifle. Set up a target at 25 yards. Remove the rifle bolt and set the rifle up on sandbags in such a position that you can look through the bore and have it centered on the target. Then, without moving the rifle, adjust the crosshairs until they're likewise centered on the target. Again, fire the rifle to make certain of the alignment.

5) When you fire repeated shots at the same target, it's difficult to remember the sequence in which the shots were fired. Keep an identical target beside you on the shooting bench. As you fire each shot, locate the bullet strike on the downrange target. With a pen or pencil, locate and number each corresponding bullet strike on your shooting bench target.

Logging each shot in sequence makes it easier to determine the effectiveness of scope adjustments. If you flinch and shoot a "flyer," it's easier to identify its downrange location if previous shots were logged in sequence.

6) Use the same ammunition for hunting that you use when sighting-in. Not only does the brand of ammo make a difference in rifle performance, bullet weights and bullet designs within the same brand make a difference.

Ridings has found that premium factory ammunition outperforms standard ammo in most rifles. Premium ammo costs about three times as much as standard loads, but it approaches hand-loaded ammo in performance.

Fine-tuning loads to suit your particular rifle is the best method of improving accuracy. If you lack the time or patience for reloading, gunsmiths such as Ridings will work up loads for you and custom load your ammunition. Custom ammunition costs slightly more than premium factory ammo. Compared to other hunting expenses, however, the price of ammunition is insignificant.

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Selecting the right Handgun for Concealed Carry

Selecting a Pistol for Concealed Carry
 

If you are reading this, perhaps you haven't made up your mind or have questions about your selection of a personal defense handgun. There have been many articles written on this subject, most of which boil down to a discussion of calibers and actions. While the caliber and action discussion is important, I find it incomplete and lacking in some important considerations for a person who carries a concealed handgun for self defense. Hence, my point of departure is what it means to live with a pistol every day.

Basics

The paradox of the concealed personal defense weapon is that it is something you hope you will never have to use for its intended purpose, but with which you must achieve a level of mastery and familiarity comparable to the other tools you use to survive and get through your day. You wouldn't drive to work in a car that you didn't know how to operate. You wouldn't wear a coat that was three sizes too small or use a carpenter's saw to slice up a pot roast. No, you use the tools appropriate to the job and you learn how to work with them competently. The same holds true with a self defense pistol. You should know how to operate it and have the level of skill necessary to use it safely and effectively. It should fit your hand and your lifestyle because you will be spending a lot of time with it. It should be comfortable to shoot and hopefully to carry.

Skill

Handguns are not easy to shoot well. The ability to consistently put bullets into a target quickly and in the places which will stop an attacker is a skill that requires a lot of practice. Too many people have the notion that a pistol is a kind of magical talisman and the user need only take it out and wave it around and the problem will magically disappear. Nothing could be further from the truth. A gun brandished at the wrong time and without the fighting skills necessary to employ it effectively will make a whole bunch of new problems, including getting you killed or arrested and charged with some very serious crimes. Hence, making the decision to carry a gun should be made only with the commitment to practice and learn.

Types and Sizes: Pros and Cons

Medium Frame Revolvers

Even though they have been around for 165 years, revolvers remain an excellent solution. These pistols are simple to use and accurate. They can handle hot loads and larger bullets making them effective personal defense weapons. Examples of this class of pistol are the Ruger GP Series and the S&W Model 66. The ideal revolver would have a 3" to 4" barrel, a six-round cylinder, and a grip that fills your hand. The biggest drawback of these pistols is the speed of reloading, but with practice, a revolver can be reloaded as quickly as an autoloader.

Medium Frame Auto Pistols

The overwhelming majority of professional trainers, operators, law enforcement and military people prefer medium to large framed autoloading pistols. These pistols have the best combination of speed, firepower, and accuracy. These pistols will generally load 8-10 rounds in their magazines (or more if you can find the magazines), have full-length grips, and 3.5" or longer barrels. These guns tend to have adequate accuracy and power, and large enough grips to be comfortable. Examples of this type of pistol would be the Glock 17, 19, 21 and 22, the S&W 39xx, 59xx, and 69xx series, the SIG 22x series, the H&K USP and P7, the Kimber ProCarry and Compact, the Springfield Champion, Para-Ordnance P12, and many others.

Large Frame Pistols and Revolvers

I like big pistols. They shoot more accurately, absorb more recoil, and develop greater muzzle velocity due to their longer barrels. I would include in this group the Beretta 92, the Colt Government Model M1911 (and clones), The N Frame S&W revolvers, Colt Python, Anaconda and their copies. Characteristically, these guns have 5" barrels and weigh 36 oz. or more. The biggest drawback of these pistols is their weight. They get heavy and small framed people may have difficulty concealing them.

Calibers and Power

I will just give you my personal opinion and you can take it for what it's worth. I like the .45 ACP and the .357 Magnum the best. Next the .40 S&W, the .44 Special and the 9mm. Then the .38 Special and the .380 ACP. There are other cartridges, but these are the most common for personal defense weapons and the ammunition is readily available.

The Selection Process

Don't be in a rush to buy the first gun you see. Give it a lot of thought. Ideally, shoot as many pistols as you can before you make a decision. Most gun ranges have pistols you can rent to see how they feel. If you have friends who own pistols, go shooting with them. Most will be happy to let you shoot their guns.

At Bass Pro Shops we have many knowledgeable associates on staff to provide advice and information.

Consider how you dress and your lifestyle. How will you carry the pistol? Can you adjust your wardrobe to accommodate your pistol? Particular body shapes may present special problems. Your physical strength and conditioning may also be a factor, i.e., powerful auto pistols tend to function better for people with strong arms and hands. How much time do you have to devote to practice? As a rule of thumb, autos require more training than revolvers, so don't pick a single-action .45 auto if you're not willing to learn to use it.

As important as any other single factor is the size and geometry of your hand. Hand size varies greatly between people and it is very important to handle a gun and note carefully the comfort of the grip and the position of the controls on the pistol. If you can't easily manipulate every control on the gun with either hand, then find a different gun. People with short thumbs may have trouble with the safety of an M1911. People with short palms may have difficulty with the thick handles of the double-stack 9mm and .40 pistols. People with meaty hands may be "bitten" by the slide of a small auto when it cycles.

Does the gun feel good in your hand? Is the trigger smooth or is it rough and heavy? Is the frame fairly narrow so that it will conceal well? Does the gun have the right balance of power, weight and size? (Remember, bigger is better for shooting and power, but can you carry it for 8 hours if you have to?)

Holsters

The selection of a holster which fits the gun you intend to carry is critically important.

Summary of Selection Criteria

  1. Your personal defense weapon should be as large and as powerful as you can shoot accurately and carry with a reasonable degree of comfort and concealment.
  2. Your personal defense weapon should fit your hand perfectly.
  3. You should be able to manipulate the controls of your weapon with either hand alone.
  4. Your personal defense weapon should be of sturdy construction and be able to withstand heavy use and rough handling.
  5. Your personal defense weapon should be accurate enough to consistently hit a target the size of a saucer at 10 yards quickly.
  6. Select the largest caliber you can shoot well, and a caliber for which ammunition is readily available.
  7. A good quality holster will be available for the model of pistol you intend to carry.
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Quick zombie Survival Tips and Products You'll Need For Zombieland!!

 

First things first, some tips on how to stay alive....

Cardio: This one comes up in Zombieland and clearly makes alot of sense. How many people do you see at the end of the world when it's zombies doing the ending?
Beware of Bathrooms: Really not just bathrooms any good apocalyptic zombie survivor should know better then going into a bathroom, small closet or any other small room with only one way in or out.Go in bigger rooms..Lots of room to run around.
Seatbelts: It's a safe bet unless you wanna die, your not going to be hoofing it on foot in the event of a zombie outbreak. So when traveling on four wheels wear your seat belt. Nothing worse then finding yourself ejected out of your car into the loving and oh so hungry arms of zombies.
Doubletap: Carrying a gun is a great idea but it should never be your primary weapon. When you do end up using it for that last minute oh crap moment, remember to double tap. It's an emergency and thats why your using it and not your cricket bat, so why skimp? One bullet more in the head will go a long way to ensuring your survival.
No Attachments: This is a tough one but you can not have attachments. If you have kids or a wife you're less likely to survive then the gal or guy who has no attachments and nothing slowing him or her down. Or worse yet making bonehead decisions like "going back into the room"
Travel in a Group: The best way to increase your odds of survival when traveling in a zombie outbreak is to make sure your not going to be eaten. Going at it alone gives the zombies no choice but to eat you, going at it with the old man with the limp, the little kid who can't run and the middle aged woman with the plastic leg gives the zombies more options and you better odds, you can run away faster then they can.

 

Keep the "not so smart" Close at Hand: One of the most sure fire ways of making sure you survive is keeping the less intelligent as close at hand as possible. When you find somebody who asks you 'Whats going on? What Happened? Those are the ones you want with you. That way when the zombies come they are likely too stupid to realize it's zombies wanting to eat them.
 Kill with Efficiency: It's not about pretty its about efficiency. Alot of folks run for the gun cabinets where their looking for the most blunt and effective way to destroy the brain. That can be anything from a baseball bat... to a toilet lid! Kill with Efficiency... don't use weapons that need something to work and use weapons you can swing over and over and over again. You wont end up running into one zombie at a time.
Guns Are for Hunting, Not for Zombie Killing: This one is simple. Guns need bullets. When your running who has time to stop for bullets? Keeping a shotgun with buckshot on hand is important but only when your pinned in and need a quick getaway. Its not a proper means for killing zombies as they run out of ammo and need reloading. Remember a Cricket Bat, or Toilet Lid do not need loading!
Be Quiet: It's the end of the world as you know it so try to avoid squeeling like a 4th grade school girl and perhaps invest in some good sneakers. Nobody wants to end up being an undead happy meal.
Know Your Way out! Nothing worse then a poorly planned escape. If your going to be a hero it's always a good idea to plan ahead and as the rule states.. know your way out!
Limber Up: When either fighting a zombie or running from zombies it's not a great time to be pulling a muscle or throwing your back out. So limbering up is kind of a must. Stretch it out a little.. it may save your life.
Blend in: Much as Shaun did in Shaun of the Dead its important to blend in. When was the last time you saw a zombie try to eat another zombie? Not easily done but with the right odor and smearing of goo on your face it can happen.

 

Find The Right Shelter: Shelter is key to survival but since we are already traveling in a group you should ask yourself why the shelter needs to be stationary. For me a motor home or large all terrain vehicle that seats a half dozen would do nicely. Plus when zombies arrive in your neighborhood there is no last minute scramble to pack and leave. Just put it in drive and roll!
Zombies can't Climb. Much like you have never seen a zombie eat another zombie when was the last time you saw a zombie climb a wall? Zombies can't climb so find high ground if you do need to stop.
Be ruthless: Much like having no attachments being ruthless is key. When your bride turns into the undead, reach for the lid to the toilet seat and be ruthless. The weak and compassionate will not survive in the world of the undead.
God Bless Rednecks: Rednecks are loud, brash, well armed and ready to kill zombies. So when a redneck shows up in your group half drunk and rumbling louder then your humvee welcome him. Sure rednecks can attract zombies but they also are well armed and kill a whole lot of them when they do come for dinner. Best of all they are good bait for you to make your exit while he is making a mess of the zombies and before he realizes he just ran out of bullets and does the happy meal groan.
Check the Back Seat. Always check the back seat friends. Always!
Enjoy the Little Things: It's the end of the world. Dont sweat the small stuff. Loot a neighborhood or two, trash a car, speed! Do the little things and enjoy them. Who knows how long you have to live!
So there, now you know some tips on how to survive Zombieland. Leave any other tips you come up with in comments!

Now, some things we carry to help you stay alive!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zombie Industries Bleeding Zombie 3-D Gun Targets

 

Birchwood Casey® Darkotic™ Zombie Splattering Gun Targets

 

Hornady Zombie Max Ammunition

 

 Crosman® Undead Apocalypse Z71 Zombie Eraser Airsoft Gun

 

Wanna see what else we have to offer..go check us out at the link below:

 

 www.BassProShops.com/Zombieland

 

 

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Traveling with Firearms for Hunting Season

 

Preparing to Travel with Firearms

 

If your intention is to grab your shotgun from the safe and stick it in the case on your way out the door without considering some safety measures in advance, you’re just looking for trouble. Do your homework! Study the requirements and procedures applicable to your trip before you travel so that you are prepared and won’t have any surprises.

If you’re traveling by airline to San Antonio or another destination, that is especially important. Here are some considerations:

  • Check the TSA website before you travel to verify your understanding of their requirements. Regulations and requirements change, so don’t assume the policies in place during your last trip still apply.
  • Specific airline requirements and procedures vary. Check with your airline before you go to the airport.
  • If you’re traveling with shotshells or other ammunition, be aware that it must be packed in an appropriate ammo container. Make sure there is no ammo in your firearm case. Specific airline requirements will vary, so check with your airline before you go to the airport.
  • Do not try to place any ammo or parts of your firearm, such as the bolt, scope, or bipod, in your carry-on.
  • If you are traveling internationally, do your research before you travel. Know the requirements of your destination country, plus the requirements of any countries that you will be passing through and the requirements of your airlines. Ignorance of the rules will only lead to disappointment and delay.
  • Do not decorate your gun cases or vehicles with shooting or firearms-related stickers or decals, i.e. no decals for NSCA, NSSA, ATA, SCI, or a brand of guns or ammo.
  • When flying with your firearms, place your gun case in a cardboard shipping container after the required inspections. Carry a small roll of tape in your carry-on for this purpose.
  • If you are shipping your guns to San Antonio or elsewhere via FedEx, UPS, or other carrier, be sure to declare it as a firearm and to follow their shipping guidelines.
  • Guns should be packed securely in their cases with no room to move around, especially along the length of the gun. If possible, remove bolts and scopes from your firearm and secure them in the case in order to prevent damage. Pack your gun case in a cardboard shipping container, if available.
  • Shipping addresses should avoid any reference to guns, firearms, shooting, etc. For example, instead of “National Shooting Complex,” use “NSSA Headquarters.” Or use the name of an individual at the recipient address, or initials or an abbreviation that deletes any reference to firearms.
  • Use appropriate cases when shipping or traveling with guns. Cases should be hard-sided, be lockable, and close tightly. Don’t use a $100 case for an expensive gun!

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, make sure your guns are insured before you travel. Have you bought a new gun or other equipment? Is your coverage up-to-date? SIAI has provided discounted, worldwide firearms insurance to NSSA and NSCA members since 1991, and we highly recommend their coverage and service. See theSIAI website for more information.

http://www.nssa-nsca.org/index.php/2012/09/protect-your-firearms-while-traveling/

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Selecting Ammunition for Hunting Season

Federal AmmunitionHunting season is upon us and everyone is busy trying to get their scopes mounted and guns sighted in for opening day.  Even hunters that choose to hunt with open sights will be hitting the range (hopefully) to get warmed up for when the shot actually counts.  Practice is the only way we can ensure a quick and efficient kill which is our duty as responsible sportsmen and women.

Ammunition manufacturers are producing new types of projectile and powder combinations each year in the hopes that they have come up with the perfect combination of power and performance, producing the next “must have” round.  Unfortunately though, it tends to muddy the water a little for someone trying to find the right ammunition for their particular type of game animal.  We all know that a whitetail isn’t the same as a coyote, and definitely isn’t the same as a hog even though all three might be pursued with the same caliber weapon.

Remington AmmunitionThankfully most of the manufacturers have gone the extra step with their websites and have included information that is infinitely more helpful for the average hunter beyond the standard ballistic information like velocity, trajectory, and energy.  They have gone so far as to identify the type of game the ammunition should be used for, and where necessary, the type of barrel a certain type of shotgun ammunition is designed for.  I went though some confusion when trying to find a round for hunting hogs with a smooth bore shotgun.  Website searches of the major companies gave me the answers I needed.

 

Winchester AmmunitionAnyone who has spent some time in the field or at the shooting bench will be able to tell you that little changes in bullet weight will drastically change the velocity, energy, and trajectory down field, so do some research to determine which load is the best all around for the game you seek.  Keep the shooter’s comfort in mind as well since increasing the bullet weight may increase the loads energy but it also increases felt recoil, potentially making it uncomfortable to shoot.  Getting more speed from a load is great when it comes to flatter trajectories but once again, higher speeds means increased recoil.

Check out the major brands and find a load that meets all of your needs and you’ll be more satisfied with the overall results in the field.

Brian “Beastman” Eastman

White River Fly Shop

Outdoor World Orlando

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“No Taxes”

Hunting and shooting can be expensive. In fact, when you add up the price of guns, ammunition, tree stands, decoys, clothing, calls, boots and optics, they can be quite expensive. And that is before the store clerk adds in state and local sales tax.  That’s why ya’ll should come on over to Bass Pro Shops in Denham Springs and take advantage of the 2nd Amendment Weekend Sales Tax Holiday.  The 2012 Louisiana Second Amendment Weekend Sales Tax Holiday* takes place Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, September 7th, 8th, and 9th. No matter what, we are ready to help you get all of your hunting wants and needs to make 2012 your best hunting year ever?

Some of the things the Holiday apply to:

  • Firearms: meaning a shotgun, rifle, pistol, revolver, or other handgun that can be legally sold or purchased in Louisiana.
  • Ammunition: means a projectile with a fuse, propelling charges, or primers fired from a firearm or gun that can be legally sold or purchased in Louisiana.
  • Archery items used for hunting, such as bows, crossbows, arrows, quivers, and shafts.
  • Off-road vehicles, such as all terrain vehicles, designed and intended primarily for hunting. (Note: this doesn't mean all ATV's qualify, the customer has to declare that they are primarily using the ATV for hunting purposes).
  • Accessories designed to be used for hunting.
  • Animal feed for consumption primarily by game that can be legally hunted.
  • Hunting apparel.
  • Hunting shoes and boots designed and used for hunting.
  • Bags to carry game or hunting gear.
  • Binoculars, only if purchased to be used for hunting.
  • Firearms or archery cases.
  • Range finders.
  • Knives that are primarily used for hunting.
  • Decoys.
  • Tree stands.
  • Blinds.
  • Optics, such as rifle scopes and impact resistant glasses for shooting.
  • Holsters.

Some things the Holiday does not apply to:

  • The holiday only applies to sales made for personal (non-business use). If merchandise being sold is going to a customer who is using it for business, trade, or professional use, then the sale is not eligible for exemption.
  • Food for animals kept as pets.
  • Knives used for recreational purposes.
  • Toy guns or other items used as children's toys.


*Act 453 of the 2009 Regular Session of the Louisiana Legislature enacted the "Annual Louisiana Second Amendment Weekend Holiday Act" that provides an exemption from the state and local sales and use taxes on individuals' purchases of firearms, ammunition, and hunting supplies on the first Friday through Sunday of each September.

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Louisiana Second Amendment Weekend No Tax Holiday!

National RedHead Pro-Hunting Team

 

Attention Hunters! The 2012 Louisiana Second Amendment Weekend Sales Tax Holiday* takes place Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, September 7th, 8th, and 9th. Let me tell you, we are excited here at Bass Pro Shops in Bossier City, whether you need a Nikon Laser Rangefinder to set up your stand in just the right location, or the Bushnell GPS to find your stand on your hunting property. We are ready to help you get all of your hunting wants and needs to make 2012 your best hunting year ever?



Some of the things the Holiday apply to:

  • Firearms: meaning a shotgun, rifle, pistol, revolver, or other handgun that can be legally sold or purchased in Louisiana.
  • Ammunition: means a projectile with a fuse, propelling charges, or primers fired from a firearm or gun that can be legally sold or purchased in Louisiana.
  • Archery items used for hunting, such as bows, crossbows, arrows, quivers, and shafts.
  • Off-road vehicles, such as all terrain vehicles, designed and intended primarily for hunting. (Note: this doesn't mean all ATV's qualify, the customer has to declare that they are primarily using the ATV for hunting purposes).
  • Accessories designed to be used for hunting.
  • Animal feed for consumption primarily by game that can be legally hunted.
  • Hunting apparel.
  • Hunting shoes and boots designed and used for hunting.
  • Bags to carry game or hunting gear.
  • Binoculars, only if purchased to be used for hunting.
  • Firearms or archery cases.
  • Range finders.
  • Knives that are primarily used for hunting.
  • Decoys.
  • Tree stands.
  • Blinds.
  • Optics, such as rifle scopes and impact resistant glasses for shooting.
  • Holsters.

Some things the Holiday does not apply to:

  • The holiday only applies to sales made for personal (non-business use). If merchandise being sold is going to a customer who is using it for business, trade, or professional use, then the sale is not eligible for exemption.
  • Food for animals kept as pets.
  • Knives used for recreational purposes.
  • Toy guns or other items used as children's toys.


*Act 453 of the 2009 Regular Session of the Louisiana Legislature enacted the "Annual Louisiana Second Amendment Weekend Holiday Act" that provides an exemption from the state and local sales and use taxes on individuals' purchases of firearms, ammunition, and hunting supplies on the first Friday through Sunday of each September.

Denise B.
Special Events Coordinator

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Deer Hunting Firearms

 

Deer Hunting Rifles

The deer is the most sought after game animal in North America, and its popularity is ever increasing. The reason for this popularity is because of the vast populations and the somewhat easiness of the hunt. It is practiced by all sorts of hunters, starting with youngsters and ending with the expert experienced hunters that have been around for ages and know all the tips and tricks of this activity.Deer hunting is a sport that requires all the basic necessities as any other hunting kind: patience, preparation and strategy, but at the same time, a higher determination level because the results often appear long after you would expect.

 

Deer Hunting Guns

The first issue that must come in our minds when choosing a gun for deer hunting is what the gun will look like. Bolt action is considered by many as the best solution, while others use on a regular basis pumps, semi-auto loaders and levers.

Deer hunting with gun is done usually less than 100 yards but there are areas where shots are taken from 200 yards and beyond. When browsing the selection of deer hunting guns, the barrel length is something to be taken seriously into consideration.

 

Deer Hunting Rifles

A shorter barrel for deer rifles will be more maneuverable and will result in a quicker shot in heavy brush at running game. These barrels are also lighter, very good for steep country. The disadvantages are loss in stability and velocity. Our users have come to the conclusion that the best all-around model of a deer hunting rifle would have to be the following: Winchester M94, Marlin 336, Savage Model 110, Winchester Model 70 and the Browning A-Bolt.

 

Deer Hunting Shotguns

For those of you interested in deer hunting with shotgun, the choice of barrel is very important. The accuracy of rifled barrels and saboted ammunition is incredible, but many smoothbores still prove very efficient in many various circumstances. Many experienced hunters have killed more deer with a 12 gauge smoothbore than most guys take with rifles. As always, it is where you put the slug that counts. A deer hunting shotgun must be light weight and offer enough power to take down the animal. Our  trusted users recommend the following deer shotguns: Mossberg’s 930 Slugster, Lightfield’s Hybred, Beretta 391, Mossberg 935 and Winchester Super X2.

 

Deer Hunting Scopes

Regarding the deer hunting scopes used, there is a lot to consider. Magnification should be 3x-9x, more than enough for deer. Brands to take into consideration would have to be Sightron (the most affordable) and Leupolds (the most expensive). It is recommend to acquire models that have a matte finish so that they will not shine when going into the woods. When it comes to choosing a crosshair or reticle (that is what you will actually see - usually a cross - when you look through the scope), it is quite hard to beat the tried-and-true cross with lines that are thicker towards the outer ends of the "hairs" and thinner in the center, where they cross. Different manufacturers call them by different names, but usually they will be named "plex" or some variation thereof. From the long list of available scopes suitable for deer rifle, visitors of the site recommended the following 5: Leupold 2.5-8x Vari-X III, 7mm-08 Leupold VX III 1.75-6, 270 WSM Nikon 3-9, Nightforce NXS and the BSA Huntsman RGB.

 

The topic of best rifle for deer hunting has been discussed for a thousand times and hunters have come up with a thousand answers. There is no such thing as the best deer hunting gun, but of course some are them are more recommended in comparison with others. However, from all of the options available today, it is worth mentioning that the Marlin Model 336C is without any doubt, the most reliable and popular deer rifle of all times. With its 20” barrel and full length magazine, it is capable of targeting fast and swing quite smoothly. This astonishing famous lever action carbine offers a rock solid top receiver for strength and easy scope mounting, forged steel parts, and a checkered, pistol grip stock made from genuine American black walnut. When you heft a Model 336 and cycle the action you can feel the quality. For these reasons many avid hunters consider it to be one of the best, if not the best deer hunting rifle available today.

 

As a conclusion, the development of deer hunting guns has come a long way and the variations today are quite impressive. Here are other reliable examples of efficient deer guns: Browning A-Bolt II Medallion, Remington Model 798 and the Remington Model Seven CDL/LS. Guns are now very accurate, lightweight and efficient, exactly what an avid deer hunter needs.

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Dove Hunting Seminar - Presented by Jim Matthews

Comprehensive Dove Seminar to Cover Top Public Hunting Spots in Southern California


 Bass Pro Rancho Cucamonga will be hosting a comprehensive dove hunting seminar with local outdoor writer Jim Matthews. He is also the editor and publisher of Western Birds, a comprehensive scouting report for Southern California bird hunters, and the two seminars he’ll be conducting at Bass Pro will discuss public land dove hunting locations across the southern half of the state.


 “The single most-asked question I receive from hunters is ‘Where can I go?’ And my seminars give new hunters and veterans alike the resources they need to find public hunting areas throughout Southern California,” said Matthews, a Southern California native who has hunted the region for over 40 years, almost exclusively on public lands.


 Matthews said the seminars will provide a package of maps and detailed instructions on how to hunt all of the popular dove hunting areas in Southern California, along with information on map resources and how to use them to scout out your own, less-crowded hotspots.
 

 He will also cover shotguns and ammunition, decoy use, and hunting tactics when setting up on fields, in desert washes and saddles, and near water sources and roost areas. There will also be a section on dove hunting etiquette.
 

 The first seminar will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, August 23. This will be followed by a 10 a.m. to noon seminar Saturday, Aug. 25.
 

 Cost is $50 per person, with family members in the same household included free for that price. The cost includes a special two-issue trial subscription to the Western Birds newsletter.
 

 For more information or to register, you can call Matthews at 909-887-3444. Flyers/registration forms are also available at Bass Pro.

dove

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Hunting Essentials - From One Customer to Another

We recently asked our Facebook fans - What are your essential hunting items?  What would you NOT leave home without when hitting the hunting trail?  Some we can help you out with, some not.  Here are the responses...from one customer to another. 

 Sara H. said  - "Handgun, license, extra ammunition, gear bag, hunting knife,
binoculars, & bug spray."
Sounds like Sara has all the bases covered...and good thinking on the license.  You definitely want to ALWAYS have that with you!  You can get them at the Customer Service counter at BPS!

 Mason says - "AR-15, warm dry clothes, warm dry boots, hunting knife, scent block, calls, whatever it takes to be comfortable...because if you're not comfortable you can't concentrate on hunting!" Toasti-Toes
Mason is planning on some cool, wet weather finally arriving sometime!  Eventually, it will get cool enough you may want to have some Toasti-Toes in your boots, too!

 Mike C. says - "Beyond the standard things, pliers are a vital part of hunting!" 
A Leatherman or Gerber multi-tool, perhaps?

 James O. - "Beef jerky!" 
Absolutely!  Need to keep the energy levels up with some protein!

 Jeff N. - "All the items sold at BPS!!! But I think the most important thing to take with you is a buddy...a wife, husband, son, daughter, your best friend or man's best friend like my black lab Belle...just seeing the look on a pal's face during a day in the field and/or watching my dog work for and making a solid retrieve keeps me going back out for more..."
Yes - Share the thrill of the hunt, introduce a friend or youngster to enjoying the great outdoors...or just spend the day with your four-legged friend! 

 Todd T. - A good dog!!!
Teach your dog to hunt sheds, too, and you've got an extra "hunting" season!


Joey F. - "Good friends and family make any hunt memorable."
Amen!

              Kenny R. - I need ammo!! And a new Bennelli would be nice!!! 
We've got 'em both

Mandy R. - The right clothing, for me, either my Matthews bow or black powder rifle, knife/saw, flashlight, extra ammo, call and rattles, have your treestands in place. Rope is a must to drag that big buck out. My number one thing this year will be my son going with me for the first time.   
That's wonderful to hear - introduce the Next Generation!  We hope you'll share pictures!

 Uriah H. - "I think the most important thing to bring with is a cell phone. You never know when you'reiPhone - Pink going to get in a sticky situation where you may need to call for help. Whether it be an accident that you need medical help or to call a buddy to help drag a deer out of the woods. It also helps a ton when you're sitting in the treestand to help time pass :)"
Make sure the battery is charged, too. Plus, you can buy a cool foneGEAR iPhone 4 camo hardshell case...we even have them in pink!

 Gina G. - "Camo and comfortable boots"
Ah-h-h - Once again, comfort!  Lots of camo on clearance right now! 

ParacordAaron K. -  "Knife and a 4 ft length of 550 cord"
Have you checked out the Chums paracord keychains and bracelets yet?  550-lb paracord unravels to lengths from 3 ft to 21 ft.  Easy to pack/wear and perfect for emergency situations.

Rick G. - "Camo and Scent-a-Way"Scent-a-Way
Yep...you don't want them to see your OR smell you!  My husband had a deer peering in his blind last fall...about two feet from his face...and coyotes hanging out, too.  But his Scent-a-Way detergent, shampoo, etc., kept him undetectable.


James S. - Knife, gun, compass (no one thinks they will get lost until they do), bottle of water, coffee, and a nice cigar to smoke after you've finished the hunt and have the game in the truck.
James, you're so right about the compass....trail markers of some sort, too,
especially if you're in an unfamiliar hunting area.

No matter the season...remember, safety first!  Good luck out there and share your photos at www.facebook.com/bpsaltoona!

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New Update for the Fall Hunting Classic

Fall Hunting Classic Update

The Fall Hunting Classic seminars will not be the only opportunity to ask questions and get tips from the pros. There will be members of the Mossy Oak pro staff available to answer your questions and share their knowledge and experience during the Fall Hunting Classic. They are scheduled to be there on the following dates from 10:00am until 4:00pm: August 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 18 and 19. In addition there will be members of the pro staff of Savage Arms there for you to talk with on August 10, 11, and 12. There will also be vendor booths from 10:00am – 4:00pm on August 10 – August 12 for you to visit. The following companies are scheduled to have booths: ATK- Federal Ammunition, Browning/Winchester Arms, Winchester Ammunition, Foxpro Game Calls and Big Game Treestands. So be sure to come by and take advantage of this opportunity to meet with these knowledgeable representatives.

 

I hope to see you there,

Don Nelson

Bass Pro Shops

Foxborough

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Gun Safety

 Come on down to the Bass Pro Shops in Katy Texas to let us show you the latest techniques and tips for gun safety.

 

  

The fundamental NRA rules for safe gun handling are:
 

    1. ALWAYS keep the gun pointed in a safe direction.
This is the primary rule of gun safety. A safe direction means that the gun is pointed so that even if it were to go off it would not cause injury or damage. The key to this rule is to control where the muzzle or front end of the barrel is pointed at all times. Common sense dictates the safest direction, depending on different circumstances.
    2. ALWAYS keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot.
When holding a gun, rest your finger on the trigger guard or along the side of the gun. Until you are actually ready to fire, do not touch the trigger.
    3. ALWAYS keep the gun unloaded until ready to use.
Whenever you pick up a gun, immediately engage the safety device if possible, and, if the gun has a magazine, remove it before opening the action and looking into the chamber(s) which should be clear of ammunition. If you do not know how to open the action or inspect the chamber(s), leave the gun alone and get help from someone who does.

When using or storing a gun, always follow these NRA rules:

 

  • Know your target and what is beyond.
    Be absolutely sure you have identified your target beyond any doubt. Equally important, be aware of the area beyond your target. This means observing your prospective area of fire before you shoot. Never fire in a direction in which there are people or any other potential for mishap. Think first. Shoot second.

     

  • Know how to use the gun safely.
    Before handling a gun, learn how it operates. Know its basic parts, how to safely open and close the action and remove any ammunition from the gun or magazine. Remember, a gun's mechanical safety device is never foolproof. Nothing can ever replace safe gun handling.

     

  • Be sure the gun is safe to operate.
    Just like other tools, guns need regular maintenance to remain operable. Regular cleaning and proper storage are a part of the gun's general upkeep. If there is any question concerning a gun's ability to function, a knowledgeable gunsmith should look at it.

     

  • Use only the correct ammunition for your gun.
    Only BBs, pellets, cartridges or shells designed for a particular gun can be fired safely in that gun. Most guns have the ammunition type stamped on the barrel. Ammunition can be identified by information printed on the box and sometimes stamped on the cartridge. Do not shoot the gun unless you know you have the proper ammunition.

     

  • Wear eye and ear protection as appropriate.
    Guns are loud and the noise can cause hearing damage. They can also emit debris and hot gas that could cause eye injury. For these reasons, shooting glasses and hearing protectors should be worn by shooters and spectators.

     

  • Never use alcohol or over-the-counter, prescription or other drugs before or while shooting.
    Alcohol, as well as any other substance likely to impair normal mental or physical bodily functions, must not be used before or while handling or shooting guns.

     

  • Store guns so they are not accessible to unauthorized persons.
    Many factors must be considered when deciding where and how to store guns. A person's particular situation will be a major part of the consideration. Dozens of gun storage devices, as well as locking devices that attach directly to the gun, are available. However, mechanical locking devices, like the mechanical safeties built into guns, can fail and should not be used as a substitute for safe gun handling and the observance of all gun safety rules.

     

  • Be aware that certain types of guns and many shooting activities require additional safety precautions.

     

  • Cleaning
    Regular cleaning is important in order for your gun to operate correctly and safely. Taking proper care of it will also maintain its value and extend its life. Your gun should be cleaned every time that it is used.

    A gun brought out of prolonged storage should also be cleaned before shooting. Accumulated moisture and dirt, or solidified grease and oil, can prevent the gun from operating properly.

    Before cleaning your gun, make absolutely sure that it is unloaded. The gun's action should be open during the cleaning process. Also, be sure that no ammunition is present in the cleaning area.

 

 

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Hunters Education Classes At Bass Pro Shops in Pearl, MS

Hunter Education works.

Since 1950, when formal hunter safety programs were introduced, the number of hunting and firearms-related accidents has declined dramatically nationwide. In Mississippi, we know that our hunter education efforts have reduced firearms accidents and saved lives. All persons born after January 1, 1972 are required to complete a hunter education course before purchasing a Mississippi hunting license. Also Effective July 1, 2000, anyone twelve (12) years of age and under sixteen (16) years of age must have a certificate of satisfactory completion of a hunter education course approved by the Department before hunting alone in this state. A child at least twelve (12) years of age and under (16) years of age may hunt without having the certificate of hunter education if the child is in the presence and under the direct supervision of a licensed or exempt hunter at least twenty-one (21) years of age when hunting. The commission may offer a resident apprentice hunting license for a resident over the age of 15 who does not have the required certificate of hunter education and may set the fee for the apprentice hunting license. An apprentice license may be purchased only one (1) time by a resident and the apprentice hunting licensee must be accompanied by a licensed or exempt resident hunter at least twenty-one (21) years of age when hunting. The Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks offers the course free of charge at locations across the state. The hunter education course includes 10 hours of instruction, including range firing. Students must be at least 10 years of age to participate and must pass a written exam and complete a firing exercise to be certified as having completed the course.

 

The Hunter Education program is designed to:

  • reduce hunting accidents
  • teach hunter ethics and responsibility
  • promote wildlife conservation
  • teach firearm safety

Specifically, the course contents include:

  • hunter ethics and responsibility
  • history of firearms
  • rifles
  • shotguns
  • ammunition
  • gun handling
  • marksmanship
  • blackpowder and muzzleloading
  • bowhunting
  • wildlife identification
  • principles of wildlife management
  • survival
  • water safety
  • hypothermia
  • first aid
  • tree stand safety

Hunters Eduacation Classes will be offered at Bass Pro Shops in Pearl, Mississippi on Saturday, August 25, 2012 and again on Saturday, October 20, 2012.  

Pre Registration is Required by calling 601.859.3421.  Tell them you were referred by the Bass Pro Shops Facebook page!

3 Comments »

Be Ready for a Zombie Outbreak with the right gear today!!!

 

zom1

 

Be Ready for a Zombie Outbreak with the right gear today!!!

Come in to Bass Pro Shops to get your latest in Zombie products!  Here are some featured products that we carry.

Zombie Plano Ammo can

• Top access storage
• Over molded handle
• Holds up to six boxes of 12 gauge ammo
The Plano Zombie Max Ammo Can features top access storage and over molded handle. Holds up to six boxes of 12 gauge ammo. Color: Black. Exterior dimensions: 15" x 8" x 10"; interior dimensions: 12.5" x 6" x 8.5"

Zombie Max Ammo
 
zom2Shot Shells:
• Lightweight, high velocity, high performance shotshells
• Loaded with hard-hitting OO buckshot
• Certified Zombie Ammunition
   Hand Gun/ Centerfire:
• Lightweight, high velocity, high performance centerfire rounds
• Loaded with super-accurate, polymer-tipped Z-Max™ bullets
• Dramatic accuracy, ultra-flat trajectories, and devastating expansion - even in low velocity situations 

Targets:
• Novelty splattering gun targets add a bit of fun to shooting practice
• White halo forms around each bullet hole - plainly see each hit in between shots
• Full color 12'' x 18'' zombie image adds fun to practice

Pepper Spray:
• Compact and fast-deploy Spitfire® pepper spray
• Quick release key chain design
• Fire with less effort and greater accuracy from any direction
• Approximately 8 bursts that fire 6-8 feet in a cone spray pattern

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Zombie Supplies

 zombies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zombie Supplies


Bass Pro Shops has a new line of Zombie products!  Here are some featured products that we have in stock.


Zombie Pepper Spray
 

pepper spray 
The fastest deploying and most compact key chain pepper spray, Saber Red Zombie Pepper Spray delivers great accuracy from its ergonomic Spitfire design. It sprays in any direction; straight on, from the hip, or over the shoulder. Quick Release design with detachable key chain allows immediate access to your defense spray. Lightweight at 0.16 ounces, one Zombie Pepper Spray canister holds approximately 8 bursts and reaches 6-8 feet in a cone spray pattern.


 Zombie Plano Ammo can
can  
• Top access storage
• Over molded handle
• Holds up to six boxes of 12 gauge ammo
The Plano Zombie Max Ammo Can features top access storage and over molded handle. Holds up to six boxes of 12 gauge ammo. Color: Black. Exterior dimensions: 15" x 8" x 10"; interior dimensions: 12.5" x 6" x 8.5"


bulletsZombie Max Ammo
 
Shot Shells:
• Lightweight, high velocity, high performance shotshells
• Loaded with hard-hitting OO buckshot
• Certified Zombie Ammunition
   Hand Gun/ Centerfire:
• Lightweight, high velocity, high performance centerfire rounds
• Loaded with super-accurate, polymer-tipped Z-Max™ bullets
• Dramatic accuracy, ultra-flat trajectories, and devastating expansion - even in low velocity situations

Targets:
• Novelty splattering gun targets add a bit of fun to shooting practice
• White halo forms around each bullet hole - plainly see each hit in between shots
• Full color 12'' x 18'' zombie image adds fun to practice

 

0 Comments »

Welcome to a world of Zombies

First there was a vampire and werewolf craze, thanks to the Twilight series of books. Vampire books and TV shows started exploding all over the world. Now, we have moved on to bigger and better things, Zombies. Yes, I said Zombies! Hornady Ammunition has started a huge trend in the outdoors industry, and that is Zombie Max ammunition. Hornady makes a huge line of Z-Max ammunition that completely intrigued, confused, and enticed the public. Just the other day, a customer held up a box of Z-Max ammo in front of my face and said, "This has got to be the dumbest thing I have ever seen." He then proceeded to put four boxes in his cart as he chuckled and waved goodbye. Their products were selling so well that is has expanded to other things.

Birchwood Casey now makes Darkotic Zombie Splattering targets. You can't help wanting to unload your gone on these gruesome targets. Kids are especially obsessed with these targets. They are incapable of seeing them without begging mom and dad to get them one, even if they don't have a gun. However it doesn't matter, because now there are Zombie edition air soft guns, with Zombie airsoft targets. Zombies are everywhere!

If that isn't enough for you, Ruger is now making a Zombie Slayer edition LCP .380. So now, you can get the gun, the ammo, the targets, and even ammo cans! Don't like guns? Don't worry, because there is a Zombie Pepper Spray made by  Sabre Red.

We all know Zombies are not real, but I'm stocking up. Just in case!

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Zombie Apocalypse Supplies

Everyone knows the apocalypse is coming and it would seem logical to be on high alert for the day when the zombies will begin to take over.

What better way to prepare yourself than to prepare supplies to help you survive! A couple of supplies are listed below that will not only help you survive, but will help you in case of an emergency as well.

 

Zombie Pepper Spray

 

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The fastest deploying and most compact key chain pepper spray, Sabre Red Zombie Pepper Spray delivers great accuracy from its ergonomic Spitfire design. Sprays in any direction; straight on, from the hip, or over the shoulder. Quick Release design with detachable key chain allows immediate access to your defense spray when unlocking a door, driving an automobile, or defending an isolated farmhouse. Lightweight at 0.16 ounces, one Zombie Pepper Spray canister holds approximately 8 bursts and reaches 6-8 feet in a cone spray pattern.

 

Zombie Plano Ammo can

  • Top access storage
  • Over molded handle
  • Holds up to six boxes of 12 gauge ammo

It’s a fact—well-organized zombie hunters have a higher kill rate. The Plano Zombie Max Ammo Can features top access storage and over molded handle. Holds up to six boxes of 12 gauge ammo. Color: Black. Exterior dimensions: 15" x 8" x 10"; interior dimensions: 12.5" x 6" x 8.5"

Zombie Max Ammo

  • Shot Shells:
    Lightweight, high velocity, high performance shotshells specially designed for zombies
  • Loaded with hard-hitting OO buckshot
  • Certified Zombie Ammunition

   Hand Gun/ Centerfire: 

Lightweight, high velocity, high performance centerfire rounds specially designed for zombies
Loaded with super-accurate, polymer-tipped Z-Max™ bullets
Dramatic accuracy, ultra-flat trajectories, and devastating expansion - even in low velocity situations

 

Targets:

What better way to practice shooting zombies than to have your own zombie target? Come pick up some targets here at Bass Pro Shops and be prepared!

  • Novelty splattering gun targets add a bit of fun to shooting practice
  • White halo forms around each bullet hole - plainly see each hit in between shots
  • Full color 12'' x 18'' zombie image adds fun to practice

Come see our designs to help you be prepared! There's a lot more supplies and firearms where these came from!

 

 

0 Comments »

HELP...we're being taken over by zombies!!!!

zaczmazps

 

When did the craze all start? That’s a good question. Well at Bass Pro Rancho it seems to have started about 6 months ago.

I can remember years ago not being able to watch all kinds of zombie movies. Like 1968’s Night of the Living Dead.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Night_of_the_Living_Dead This movie seems to be the one that started it all.  I was two then, but when I was 12 and being watched by my grandmother, she let me watch my first zombie movie. It was 1978’s Children Shouldn’t Play with Dead Things.  I’ve never really been a big fan of the Zombie -type movies. But, I can’t deny there is a craze. During the 2000’s movies came out that would reach a more diverse crowd like the remake of Dawn of the Dead, Resident Evil and Shaun of the Dead. 

You’re probably asking yourself...what do Zombie movies have to do with Bass Pro Shops?   Well, let me try and explain.

Several months ago we got a request for some Zombie Max™ ammunition.  This question seemed to be the start of a string of customers asking for zombie related products.

Be PREPARED – supply yourself for the Zombie Apocalypse with Zombie Max ammunition from Hornady! Loaded with PROVEN Z-Max bullets. Make sure your "bug out bag" is ready with nothing but the best! 

So, we were now in the Zombie Craze. Next thing you know we have Zombie ammo cans, Zombie Targets and just recently received Zombie Pepper Spray.

http://www.basspro.com/Birchwood-Casey-Darkotic-Zombie-Splattering-Gun-Targets/product/12010911052855/388619.

How to best ward off those zombies??  Everyone had to have a Short barrel Home Defense Shotgun. Kind of like the Remington 870 Marine Magnum.

How about a shotgun that has Skulls on it by Weatherby...yea...we got ya' covered.

Now don’t forget the most popular firearm to keep you safe from Zombies... The Modern Sporting Rifle, or M.S.R. The Colt AR 15 is one. The Bushmaster AR 15 is another.

So, let me try to wrap it all up. This Zombie Craze that everyone is talking about seems to have all started with a crazy black in white movie. Made before a lot of you were even born. With technology being what it is today, you can go back in time and watch things that were made when your parents were your age. So, if you’re so inclined to protect yourself from the Vicious Zombies out there, make sure you stop by Bass Pro in Rancho Cucamonga and we'll help you with all your zombie defense needs!!

mag

 

sjulls

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FREE Family Summer Camp

Summer 2

 

Family Summer Camp
 

JUNE 9TH TO JULY 15TH

The 2012 Family Summer Camp Event is geared to offer families a way to spend an
enjoyable summer together with free crafts, interactive displays and outdoor skill
workshops, in an atmosphere much like the summer camps many of us attended as
kids ourselves.

ShootingThe Event offers:
 

  • -FREE Shooting Gallery

  • -FREE Casting Pond and Targets

  • -FREE Archery Shooting Range

  • -FREE Crafts like the ones you used to make in summer camp—custom leather crafting,
    painting a bear track mold, painting a wiggle snake, decorating a seedling pot,
    creating your own Catch-A-Fish game, painting a birdhouse….a different craft activity
    each Saturday and Sunday and Tuesday and Thursday thru the event dates, while supplies last.

  • -FREE photos Saturdays and Sundays (1:00pm-4:00pm)—enjoy getting a picture of the kids or the whole

  • family made in front of an outdoors backdrop

  • -FREE S’mores activity each Saturday night between, 6:00pm-7:00pm throughout the event

In addition, Free Family Summer Camp Workshops(no registration needed) will be held Tuesdays and

Thursdays, and Saturdays and Sundays featuring:
 

-Bird Watching: Listen and identify various bird sounds and learn about threatened species.
-Hunting and Shooting Basics: Learn about hunting seasons, clothing, ammunition and safety
-Fishing Basics: Covering different kinds of lures, bait and the fishing seasons.
-Outdoor Discovery and conservation: Learn about the importance of conserving the beauty of the Great Outdoors.
-Backyard Adventure:  Learn about the different trees, insects, animals and pests you should avoid.
-Archery: Learn about Bow Hunting and the different parts of a compound bow and important tips!
-Camping Basics: Learn what to expect when camping and what you need to bring to be comfortable.
-Wildlife Exploration: Learn how to identify more common animals that you can encounter on your outdoor adventure.
-Dogs in the Outdoors: Learn how to keep your best friend comfortable, and discuss different dog breeds and the different activities that’s dogs enjoy.

Kids will earn a collectible pin for every workshop completed and a Bass Pro Lanyard, again, while
supplies last.

Yup

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