2014 Fall Hunting Classic

Fall Hunting Classic 2014 - Bass Pro Shops Altoona

It's the Fall Hunting Classic at Bass Pro Shops Altoona - 17 days of great sales and events to prepare you for the hunting season!  Here's the linup of Hunting Classic Events!

First Weekend - August 2 - Free Hunting Classic UniversityHunting University - Bass Pro Shops Altoona

Join us for these great, nationally-recognized speakers!
1 p.m. - Bric Steward, Drury Outdoors Team, Bow Madness - "Hunting Mature Whitetails"
2 p.m. - John Dudley from the Nock On TV Show and Under Armor Arsenal Hunter - "Guaranteed to Always be Lethal"
3. - Jeremy Moore, Renowned Dog Trainer and Developer of the DogBone Training Products - "Developing Your Deer Dog."

Second Weekend - August 9 & 10 - Next Generation Weekend for Kids!

As usual, we've included a weekend JUST FOR KIDS!

Noon- 5 on Saturday and Sunday:

  • Youth Seminars - "Fall in the Outdoors" - a special workshop for just youth
  • BB Shooting range
  • Free photo download- Like you're on the cover of Adventure Kids magazine!

Noon - 5 on Saturday and Sunday Crafts Noon - 4pm - Wood fox and squirrel craft!

Free giveaway to the first 100 kids who get their cards punched each day - a Bass Pro Shops Fox Drawstring bag!

 

NEW THIS YEAR! August 9 - 3 p.m. - Women's Hunting Workshop!

Seminar attendees can register to win a pair of Oculus Binoculars or a RedHead folding knife!

 

August 15-17 - Local Pros Weekend - Free Seminars with Local Hunting Experts
Friday, August 15

7:00pm – So You Think You Know How to Bow Hunt?

Saturday, August 16

1:00pm – Autumn Hunt: New Approaches to Fall Success

2:00pm – Tender Venison? It’s Easier Than You Think

3:00pm – Does Camo Pattern Really Matter?

4:00pm – Why You Should be Hunting Coyote

5:00pm – How to Integrate Your Game Camera with Mobile Devices

Sunday, August 17

1:00pm – Autumn Hunt: New Approaches to Fall Success

2:00pm – Tender Venison? It’s Easier Than You Think

3:00pm – Does Camo Pattern Really Matter?

4:00pm – Why You Should be Hunting Coyote

5:00pm – How to Integrate Your Game Camera with Mobile Devices

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This Weekend @ Bass Pro Shops Altoona - PBR Fun for Kids!

Saturday and Sunday, July 26 & 27

PBR Family Fun - Noon to 4 p.m.Best Cowboy or Cowgirl contest

  • Bull Roping & Stick Bull Riding
  • Face Painting
  • Free Cactus Cowboy craft for kids!

 

SUNDAY ONLY - Best Dressed Cowboy/Cowgirl contest, judged at 3:00pm - One winner receives a $50 gift card!

 

Also Around the Store This Weekend

Sunday, July 27 - Legal Heat Concealed Carry class from 10:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Try Before You Buy - Our Gifts Dept will be sampling Cherith Valley Roasted Red Pepper & Pineapple Chipotle Salsa on Saturday and Pickled Asparagus on Sunday, both from noon - 4 p.m.

 

WHAT’S COMING UP NEXT???Jeremy Moore and Timber

The Fall Hunting Classic kicks off on Friday, August 1! Our national pros are here on Saturday, August 2 for our Free Hunting University. Bric Steward from Drury Outdoors - "Hunting Mature Whitetails", John Dudley from Nock On TV -"Guaranteed to Always be Lethal", and Jeremy Moore, originator of the DogBone system, with his friends Tailer and Timber - Developing Your Deer Dog

Bric Steward and John Dudley

Timber

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Plan a Pollinator's Dream Yard!

For a variety of reasons, butterflies and bees are both on a decline. Harsh winters, loss of habitat and food supplies from increased development means fewer migration spots for butterflies. Bees have a similar problem.  The thing is, we NEED butterflies and bees to help pollinate our plants and create fun foods like honey!

According to Monarch Watch the upper Midwest (the eastern Dakotas, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Michigan and parts of Indiana) are crucial to the fall monarch hatch.

"Monarchs arriving in the southern area from Mexico (in March) lay eggs on milkweeds, and the adults that develop as a result of this reproduction move northward into the summer breeding range in May and early June. This northward moving first generation spreads out over the north from the Dakotas to the Maritime Provinces in Canada. However, it is the production of the monarchs in the center of the “corn belt” that is critical. Our tagging data over the last 20 years and an earlier study using isotopes (Hobson and Wassenaar 1998, Wassenaar, et al. 1999) have shown that most of the monarchs reaching the overwintering locations in Mexico originate from this region."

Monarch Watch figure

What can you do to help?  The Blank Park Zoo in Des Moines, Iowa, has started the Plant. Grow. Fly. program to help rebuild the habitat and butterfly population. You can help by creating pollinator habitats at home, school or work...and there's plenty of summer left to do it!Painted Lady

Think about it, according to the Plant. Grow. Fly information, more than one-third of our global food supply depends on butterflies and bees...pollinators.

From zinnias in a flower pot to bigger backyard areas to large parks, we can all do our part to help keep the pollinator population thriving. Milkweed is a HUGE attractant to butterflies and one of the major reasons our area is so attractive to them. It is a host plant - a place for monarchs to lay their eggs and then serve as a food source for caterpillars. Native grasses also serve well, as do Hollyhocks, Black-Eyed Susans, and Sunflowers.

The adult pollinators need nourishment. Zinnias, Bee Balm, Coneflowers and Cosmos are pretty sure to attract not only butterflies, like the Monarch, Painted Lady, and Swallowtail, but also bees, and birds!Painted Lady - Bass Pro Shops Altoona

For more information on how to get started and on the Plant. Grow. Fly. program, visit our friends at the Blank Park Zoo!

Bee Balm - Bass Pro Shops Altoona(Bee Balm)

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PBR Fun is Back at BPS Altoona!

Family PBR Activities at Bass Pro Shops Altoona

Saturday and Sunday

July 26 and 27

Noon - 4 p.m.

Free fun activities for the kids and family!

  • Stick bull riding
  • Bull roping
  • Free cactus cowboy craft!PBR Days at Bass Pro Shops Altoona!

Plus a free cowboy hat light up key chain to the first 100 customers each day!

You know you're NEVER too old to get your face painted, too! Take it from this family - last year they ALL did it!

Once again our BEST Cowboy or Cowgirl Contest will be held - Sunday, July 27 - one winner receives a $50 Bass Pro Shops Gift Card!

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Behind the Scenes: A Buck and a Truck

Most of the photos on our store walls are on loan from the Iowa Historical Society or the Iowa State Historical Museum. The great thing is - they are ALL real people.

Recently, a customer told us the history of a large photo that hangs over the Archery counter. A special photo that he had been trying to get to the store to see. This was his first time to see it since we've been open (five years almost) and he was proud to say, "That's my dad."

 Behind the Scenes - Bass Pro Shops Altoona

Here's how the story goes:

Gaylend Hamann (right) and Don Gofier (left), were from around Anthon, Iowa. One morning they were enjoying coffee first thing  prior to going out for the opening day of the very first bow season for deer hunting in Iowa.

Before shooting hours, the two were heading to some hunting ground near Blencoe, Iowa. They stopped near a roadside ditch, waiting for the official shooting hour.

As soon as the hour to hunt arrived, they got out of the car. They walked down into a ditch, a buck stood up from the ditch, and Gaylend shot and killed the buck within just minutes of shooting hours. The doe was taken just a couple hours later. This picture was taken in the back alley outside of the meat locker in Anthon, just hours after the hunt.

It is a picture of what possibly could be the very first deer legally taken with a bow in Iowa.

Capture the moments.

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Product Spotlight - Wiley X

We have Wiley X sunglasses available once again at Bass Pro Shops Altoona...and many customers are happy! What's so great about Wiley X?

  • They've been a producer of standard issue military eye wear for years and their sunglasses are the first choice for many outdoor sportsmen and women - from pro anglers to race car drivers to shooters and motorcyclists.
  • All Wiley X shades are certified to ANSI Z87.1 2003 high impact and optical standards. Lens are made from one of the most impact resistant materials. They are virtually indestructible.
  • Filter 8TM Polarized Lens - Eight layers of technology create one fantastic way to cut glare that can hamper fishing, boating, and other outdoor activities, plus cause eye fatigue.
  • Wiley X technology:
    • Meets or exceeds the military's ballistic standards for eye wear.
    • Meets and exceeds ANSI z87.1 high velocity impact safety and optical standards. This means they qualify as OSHA Occupational Eye Protection.
  • The Climate Control Series of Wiley X sunglasses features:Wiley X Climate Control
    • The patented, removable Facial CavityTMSeal that forms to your face and blocks out peripheral light plus the wind and all those things that come with it, like dust and debris.
  • The Changeable Series of sunglasses feature multiple lens combinations. The swappable lenses are shatterproof, good for any kind of shooting conditions.Wiley X - Changeable
  • The Street Series has nearly indestructible shatterproof lenses and frames and are often sought out by motorcyclists.
  • The Active Series' non-slip nose pads and temple gloves make them a perfect glass for those who enjoy the outdoor activities that involve a lot of motion and, therefore, sweat!wiley X Active

WileyX is the choice of many anglers, shooting sportsmen, race car drivers, and outdoor enthusiasts. You can see and try some of the styles in person at Bass Pro Shops Altoona or, if you know what you're looking for, you can also get them online at www.basspro.com.

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Packing/Organizing Gear for a Group Trip

Going on a group hunt this fall? Whether deer, elk, or bird, it takes a group effort of coordination for supplies, vehicles/drivers, etc. If you'll be going on a group trip where you need to provide your own cots, or you just wish for better sleeping accommodations at a location you've been to before, check out these new items from Disc-o-Bed at Bass Pro Shops!  

disc-o-Beds

The Disc-o-Bed Cam-o-Bunk - From two single cots to two double cots - make more room for more people! Modular, portable and durable - allows you to sleep that much more comfortably while at hunt camp. The anti-rust frame features a rounded edge bed frame for the bottom bunk, so it doesn't damage the tent floor or sink into the ground. It can also convert to a bench for more living space and seating during the day!  It also has these great functional side organizers with multiple pouches, both opened and zippered. 

Store those personal items you want close at hand!

The Disc-o-Bed Military Footlocker

Disc-o-Bed Footlocker

The footlocker is perfect for more storage under the Disc-o-Bed bunk. It won't affect the cots sleeping deck and features multiple inner and outer pockets for storage. Best feature? Durable and water resistant!

Disc-o-Bed Storage Cabinet

This handy storage piece has outside measurement of 30.25" L X 23.75" W X 13.5" H. There are three interior shelves with movable dividers - it's perfect for storing snacks, shoes, and other personal items you'd like close at hand. 

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This Weekend @ Bass Pro Shop Altoona - Tent Sale and Dog Tails

Saturday, July 19 - Sunday, July 27  - Tent Sale!Tent Sale

Storewide clearance event with 20-50% off items from all departments! Look for the giant red balloons and the tent in the parking lot!

 

Saturday, July 19 - ARL Adoption Day!

The Animal Rescue League of Iowa will hold an Adoption Event on our front lawn!
they're continuing their on-site adoption special of $25 - cats and dogs – all ages! Come find a new friend!

 

Coming Up

July 26 and 27 - PBR Family Fun Event!

Noon- 4 p.m. - Free fun activities for the kids!

Stick bull riding, bull roping, face painting, and free cactus cowboy craft.

Free cowboy hat light up key chain to the first 100 customers each day!

Best Cowboy or Best Cowgirl Contest on Sunday only -- judging begins at 2:30 p.m. $50 gift card to the winner!

August 1-10 - Digs for Dogs Event!Digs for Dogs - Bass Pro Shops Altoona

It's Bass Pro Shops Altoona's first annual "Digs for Dogs" Doghouse contest to benefit the Animal Rescue League of Iowa!
Two ways to help:

  • BUILD a doghouse for our silent auction to benefit the ARL
  • BID on a doghouse!

Enter as an individual, a non-profit team (for example, a scout troop), or as a business. One winning entry for creativity in each category receives a $150 gift card! Complete details, deadlines, and the registration form are right here!

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Product Spotlight - The CHILLRaft!

Have a boat or a dock and looking for some new summer fun? There's still plenty of time to enjoy the sun and water with a CHILLraft! At 6' x 14' and 1.25" thick, the Original CHILLraft only weighs 25 pounds, yet can support your "crew" of kids or adults or both...up to 1,000 pounds! They're NOT lifesaving devices and you should still wear a life jacket and kids should be supervised...in other words, all proper safety precautions should be taken. This floating "dock" is all the rage down south....and it's making its way north!

So chill, man, and grab a CHILLraft!  Only at Bass Pro Shops Altoona and NOT online.

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The Value of a Fish - A Dad's "Reel"-ization

By Jason Truman, General Manager
Bass Pro Shops Altoona

I used to occasionally fish with my father and grandfather. We would sit on the shore and wait patiently...or not so patiently, in my case...for the bobber to bounce, all the time conversing about whatever random topic might present itself. Where we fished, the bites were few and far between, so I think the conversation was probably of the most interest. 

While I enjoyed the time, I never really took to fishing as something that I would choose over other activities. As a matter of fact, that lack of enthusiasm for fishing translated to my offending my wife-to-be later in life. I remember one day when we were dating and looking for something to do on a particular afternoon, she suggested we go fishing.

“What? Fishing is so boring!”

About a year later, I was visiting a friend’s home and he happened to live on a lake. He suggested we take his canoe out and do a spot of fishing and I agreed. He actually taught me quite a bit about fishing and I really enjoyed it. Well, my wife was none to happy with my new found enthusiasm for fishing after denying her previously.

That was almost twenty years ago and my wife still refuses to fish with me simply out of spite. Fortunately, for me, I have taken those years and fished quite a bit with friends and other family, fishing from Texas to Ontario, Canada, and many points in between. I've had a lot of great times and made many memories. I have to say, though, that the best memories are being made right now.

I used to think there was not much of anything better than getting on the water early and spending a few hours by myself, communing with nature and wetting a line. It was always such a quiet and peaceful time that it felt like nothingBass Pro Shops Altoona else in the world mattered right then. It was time with your thoughts and, hopefully, a few fish. Heck, even if there were no fish, nobody else needed to know!

My youngest daughter, Sidney, has taken quite a liking to fishing and is becoming a pretty good little angler. She really became enthusiastic about fishing with me last year when she was ten. Recently, she took a little trek up to Lake of the Woods with me and two of my longtime friends and their kids. Now, anyone who has been on a trip like this knows the new guy usually has some beginner's luck that kind of digs at the rest of the group. True to form, Sid outfished everyone...and was sure to let us all know about it. We've hit some of the local lakes around central Iowa this year, as well, and have had some good success at times. It doesn’t matter where we fish, it’s always fun!

I now realize I no longer think much about fishing alone. When Sid is fishing with me, I get to teach her everything I’ve learned about fishing. Twenty years of reading books, watching fishing shows, fishing with others, quizzing the pros…it’s all at her disposal. She is showing a passion for fishing and is hungry to learn!

I have taught my daughter how to do a lot of things in eleven years, but sharing fishing with her is one of the most rewarding experiences I have ever had. To her, I am Kevin VanDam, and Keith Kavajecz all in one! To her, the way I rig my plastics, or the color I choose, is an exact science that commands the level of respect normally bestowed on those who split atoms or win Nobel prizes. She asks questions, she watches what I do, and she tries to do the same! 

Last week we were out on the boat on a quiet weekday morning doing a little bass fishing. I had caught five or six fish in the first 45 minutes or so and was talking a little “smack” to Sidney because she had yet to have a bite. I was fishing a stick bait and she was fishing a fluke. I was going to switch her out to what I was using, so she might have a little better chance. She took the opportunity to learn how to Texas Rig the bait and then, after a few minutes of being caught in the weeds, how to rig it weightless.

A few more casts went by and I was feeding instructions and demonstrating the technique.

"Cast it into that pocket, count to three while it drops, tighten your line, give it a little pop, do it again.” 

She was listening and following instructions, when she realized she should hold her rod just a little Sidneybit tighter, as it was just about pulled out of her hand on a big strike. 

“Set the hook, Sidney, keep your line tight...keep reeling.” 

This lunker was stripping line and trying to run laps around the boat. Sid’s hand was clamped around the rod handle with everything she had and the other was slowly cranking the reel. 

“She’s going to jump, Sid…keep the line tight, don’t let the hook shake loose!” 

She followed every instruction with a focus I rarely see. The fish came out of the water twice before wearing down and when we got it into the boat Sid’s smile was nothing less than immense!  She thumbed the lip of this big bucket mouth and we digitally preserved the moment, the fish, and that big smile! 

It turned out to be Sid’s only fish of the morning, but that was okay.

"Geez, dad, one big fish CAN make your day!”

I agreed with her, but never told her that her one fish was worth more to me than it was to her. Finding a passion that you can share with someone is a great thing. Being able to foster that passion in somebody so close to you is the best thing in the world!

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Product Spotlight - Lodge Cast Iron

Fried Chicken with Cast Iron - Bass Pro Shops AltoonaDo you cook with cast iron? For some, it's the ONLY way to fry chicken because of the even heat disbursement. But cast iron can be used to cook anything! Whether on the stove, in the oven, over the fire, or Dutch Oven-style, Lodge cast iron is efficient, long-lasting, and made in the USA!

We recently bought the 15 1/4" diameter Lodge cast iron skillet to replace one we used to have and inadvertently left behind in a move. We used our Bass Pro Shops burner from our aluminum fish fryer and decided to fry chicken on the patio. Even heat and long-lasting heat retention makes cast iron the first choice of chefs all over the world. 

*  Ready to use right out of the box - A newly developed process seasons the skillet at the factory, so the Lodge cast iron is ready to go. You don't have to season it yourself and it doesn't take many, many batches of chicken before you have it just right.

*  A traditional handle, PLUS an assist handle makes it easier to lift and transport. 

*  A pour lip makes it easier to dump the oil for reuse. 

*  Last, but not least, it's Made in the U.S.A., by Lodge which has been making it for over 100 years...and is now the only U.S. company making cast iron cookware. 

Don't be afraid - grab some cast iron and start cooking!

 

For a great look at Lodge and the rebirth of cast iron, check out this NBC Nightly News video!

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Outdoor Cooking Primer - Brick Chicken

Brick Chicekn - Bass Pro Shops Altoona BlogFlattened, crispy, and seemingly less wasteful, the brick chicken or "Chicken Under a Brick" concept has been around for eons. For Italians, especially in the Tuscany area, and others in Europe, have been preparing chicken this way for hundreds of years.

My husband and I have seen this technique often and decided to try it. Unbelievably, the first key, and sadly most difficult for us, was coming up with two bricks. We just didn't have any laying around! But, a couple of small pieces of landscaping block did the trick. So, I guess you could call it Chicken under the Pavers.

The second key is properly cutting and partially boning the chicken in half so that each piece lays flat. If you do it right, this allows the chicken to cook evenly and gets the maximum surface coverage for the chicken, so it gets nice and crispy. We actually cut the chicken in half, and removed the back bone and some other smaller bones, but traditional mode is to leave it whole and simply flatten it by removing the backbone.

We seasoned with salt and pepper blends and tucked some fresh rosemary sprigs up under the skin.

We had the back burner off on on our gas grill, with the center burner on medium and the front on high. It took about 60 minutes over all, flipping the two halves at about 30 minutes.

We ended up with plenty of grilled chicken for two meals and what seemed to be much less mess and no chicken carcass carnage afterwards from which to pick the meat off.

We give the Chicken Under a Brick (or landscaping block) two thumbs up!

You can find many instructions and recipes online - the one that sparked us to give it a try was on Bon Appetit's web site.

Enjoy!

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This Weekend @ Bass Pro Shops Altoona - Final Days of Summer Camp!

Family Summer Camp - Bass Pro Shops Altoona

It's the final weekend for Family Summer Camp activities at Bass Pro Shops Altoona!
Our Family Summer Camp provides fun and educational activities for kids that they can use the rest of the summer!

Even better, it's a GREAT way to beat the heat on a weekday afternoon - kids can have fun and learn at the same time!

Schedule - July 12 & 13

Free outdoor activities from noon until 5 p.m. including the Daisy BB gun range, casting, and archery.

 

Free crafts - Noon - 2 p.m. - Crafts change each week! This week's craft is coloring a wolf track!Family Summer Camp Bass Pro Shops Altoona

Homemade ice cream sampling - 5-6 p.m. on Saturday evening only.

Last, but not least, our popular workshops - Each child receives a lanyard at their first workshop and a pin for each workshop they attend!

Workshops Schedule

Saturday, July 12
12 p.m. - Fishing
1 p.m.- Water Safety
2 p.m. - Shooting and Hunting
3 p.m. - Kayaking
4 p.m. - Birdwatching

Sunday, July 13
12 p.m. - Shooting and Hunting
1 p.m. - Archery
2 p.m. - Travel Safety
3 p.m. - Camping and Conservation
4 p.m. - Backyard Adventures

 

Also this weekend:

Sunday, July 13 - Preferred Rewards Night - 6-9 p.m.

Members-Only After Hours Event for all Preferred Rewards Card members. You will need your invitation to get in - triple points, plus a bonus "mystery" offer based on the coupon on your invitation. Drawings for four $25 gift cards, and a Brinkman 4-burner gas grill.

Coming up!

Tent Sale and Clearance Event - July 17-16
PBR Family and Kids Events Days - July 26-27 - Noon-4 p.m.

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Born Again

By: Todd Sanders and Rod Slings, Guest Bloggers

Introductory note by Rod Slings, hunting safety expert, retired Iowa DNR law enforcement supervisor, and member of the Central Iowa Longbeards Chapter.

Todd Sanders was a very active outdoorsman who was injured in October 2013, when he fell from his treestand. Todd spent three months in the hospital after his injuries. He is wheelchair bound…for now. Our National Wild Turkey Federation Chapter's Wheelin’ Sportsman hunt took place the Saturday of Easter weekend. Todd has recently faced some major challenges in his personal life, aside from the physical injuries he sustained from his fall. Todd has a strong faith in God; Todd’s story below brought him back from a place that would challenge anyone. We are honored to open the door to the great outdoors for Todd and others with the help of our sponsors, volunteers and the NWTF.

Born Again

By: Todd Sanders

April 19, 2014, was a very special hunt I was invited to by a good friend, Rod Slings, who is a retired law enforcement supervisor with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. The hunt was the National Wild Turkey Federation’s Wheelin’ Sportsmen Wild Turkey Hunt put on by the Central Iowa Longbeards Chapter. This was the 7th annual hunt intended for disabled veterans and people that face some disability challenges.

To say that I was excited was an understatement, as Rod and I texted back and forth the final week before this awesome day! After what seemed like a sleepless night, my alarm sounded off at 2:00 a.m. I gathered my gear and Rod met me at my house at 3:30 a.m. to pick me up. 

Butterflies and sweaty palms accompanied me as we drove to Jester Park, where our hunt would be based, smiling like two young kids. I was able to meet all the great people who made this event happen. We gathered for a wonderful breakfast and a prayer to give thanks and asked for safety for the hunt. I was loaded into a Kubota UTV and soon Rod and I, along with my new friend Zach, were dropped off at the site where our blind was set up and ready. Within ten minutes of the park rangers and event volunteers leaving our location, I suddenly heard my favorite sound in the world! There it was - “GOBBLE-GOBBLE-GOBBLE” - about 100 yards away in the timber behind us. 

We all looked at each other with smiles and big wide-open eyes like children in a candy store. As the morning sunrise broke through the timber, we all started calling, nice and easy. This big tom apparently liked what he was hearing.

Rod said, “Breathe, Todd, breathe!” 

I smiled and gripped my bow tighter. Well, as all you turkey hunters know, gobblers are incredibly unpredictable. We heard the gobbler fly down from his roost and then…he went AWAY from us! A sassy hen was answering our calls. As I used the diaphragm call, Zach did the box call, and Rod followed with calls on his slate.

Suddenly, another gobbler, not far away, got very fired up from our calls - we probably sounded like a Sunday choir. This gobbler started responding back, getting closer and closer. Then, the hen passed five yards behind the blind to my left.   Minutes later we heard a very loud "GOBBLE." As I looked over Rod’s left shoulder, the majestic gobbler appeared, all tail feathers fanned out, about 65 yards away in the hardwood timber. 

I whispered, “There he is, I see him over Rod’s left shoulder, he’s looking this way.” 

My heart was pounding as the gobbler disappeared. Now he was circling us, trying to get a visual of those sweetheart hen noises that fired him up.

Zach said, “don’t move there he is!” 

Well, naturally, I moved and looked through the window near Rod. I saw a big blue head weaving through the brRod Slings and Todd Sandersush and briars. 

Zack whispered, “Draw back, draw back!”

As I did, he slipped right past the hunting blind window, my first shooting lane, on a beeline to the Jake decoy. As I regained my composure, Rod and Zach coached me. I did two sharp cuts on my diaphragm call - the gobbler stopped and turned. He was at 22 yards, quartering away, bumping up against the Jake decoy. I steadied my 20-yard pin on my bow sight behind the back of his wing and touched the release to see feathers immediately fly as the big gobbler flipped upside down!

Within seconds, the big tom was up running directly toward our blind wobbling like a drunken old man. 

I yelled, “GET HIM, GET HIM,” as the big bird took off into the timber. Zach desperately tried to open the zipper on the back of the blind by my wheelchair.  Imagine this - I am on the edge of my seat in my wheelchair in the blind,and I am now watching Rod and Zach go running into the timber out of sight. All I could hear were branches breaking and wings beating the dry leaves, but couldn’t see anything!  

I yelled, “Did you get him?” 

"YES!" Zach yelled back.

I screamed and hollered like a crazy man! Rod and Zach came back off the ridge, Zach holding my gobbler by the leg. Zach said, “Man, could you have shot a smaller turkey?” 

I couldn’t believe the size of the big gobbler as it was dropped at my feet. We yelled, hugged, high-fived and thanked Jesus, like we had just won the World Series. Rod called the park rangers and said, “Gobbler down, head this way.”

When the rangers arrived, we took pictures, again slapped high fives and celebrated this awesome hunt. After arriving back to Jester Park, our base for the hunt, we found out that two of the other hunters had also harvested birds. We shared fellowship over lunch, took more pictures, and relived and shared the story of our hunt over and over. 

This hunt was a real blessing to me having just recovered from a bow hunting accident where I fell from my treestand and broke my back leaving me wheelchair bound. This hunt gave me strength, hope and faith that my best days are still ahead of me!  I look forward to next year and thank God daily for this wonderful hunt that will be engraved in our spirits forever!  A very special thanks to Rod Slings who invited me to this event allowing me to harvest my best turkey to date!  25 pounds, 14 ounces with a 10-¾ inch beard and one inch spurs! 

BORN AGAIN!

Zach, Todd, and Rod

(Zach, Todd, and Rod)

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Travel Safety Items for Near and Far

Traveling this summer? Maybe you're going some place where you'll be around a lot of people - New York City, Disney World, or events and attractions like our great Iowa State Fair or theme parks.

We have some new products designed to give you some peace of mind while you travel. The Lewis N. Clark line of RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) products protect the "electronic pickpocketing" of your personal identity and information, by protecting the chips that contain electronically-stored information.

From head to waist you can protect your valuable personal and financial information with these three products:

RFID Waist Stash - Bass Pro Shops AltoonaThe Lewis N. Clark RFID Waist Stash:  This is not your father's fanny pack of the 80's. A waist strap adjustable to 50" keeps your valuables close to you in two mesh compartments, built into this 5x11" stash.

Lewis N. Clark RFID Neck Stash - RFID Neck Stash - Bass Pro Shops AltoonaThis stash has a neck strap that can go from 1" to 25.5", so it's adjustable for a variety of "people heights" for comfort and concealment! It has four compartments, including an ID window, so I think it would be perfect for large events like the Iowa State Fair, where you might have to show your ID to enjoy a frosty beverage.

Lewis N. Clark RFID Hidden Travel Wallet - Simply attach the wallet to your belt and tuck it inside your pants. Easy concealment to protect your money, passport, tickets, and other important documents.

All of the RFID products are made of 100% ripstop nylon with Travel/Dry Technology. Since you're often carrying these items close to your body, this technology keeps the stash cool, dry, and comfortable all day long and is resistant to mildew, odor and shrinkage.

 Lewis N. Clark Lockdown Triple Security LockHere's one more item that's NOT RFID, but still adds extra protection. The Lewis N. Clark Lockdown™ Triple Security Lock is a TSA-approved lock is designed to secure your luggage and gear in three ways - it locks the zip pulls, locks the handle to the pulls (designed to make the zipper unrepairable if thieves enter the bag), or lock the bags to a fixed object.

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Beginning Archery for Ladies - Part One: The Bow

BrickerBy - Alicia Bricker, Gun Vault Specialist

Ladies, are you interested in archery, but aren’t sure where to get started? Don't have someone who can take you out and show you the ropes? I'll get you started. Archery is a fun and exciting sport and anyone can get involved.

 

The Bow

First off, you'll need a bow that fits you - you need to be comfortable with how it feels when you shoot it. Go out and try several different bows. I suggest a bow that can grow with you as you get stronger. Two aspects that are important are the draw weight and the draw length. They make a variety of bows with different draw weight variations that you can try.

Draw weight - The amount of weight you will have to pull when drawing back your bow.

Draw length - The length you will draw your bow back. This varies with your "wing span" (length of your arms) and you will want to get this calculated before picking out your bow. Your draw length is determined by measuring the distance between your arms and you will need someone to help you measure.

1. Hold your arms straight out to your sides, palms facing forward.

2. Measure from the tip of your middle finger to the other tip of your middle finger then divide by 2.5.

This will give you an estimate of your draw length, but it may need to be adjusted depending on how it feels to you when shooting. Our archery experts can always help you determine what the best draw length is for you.

A couple of good beginner bows, both of which offer quite a bit of growth in draw weight are:

The Quest G5 Radical, which ranges as low as 15 Lbs up to 70 LBS draw weight with a draw length of 17.5” up to 30”

The Diamond Infinite Edge which ranges all the way from 5 LBS up to 70LBS for draw weight and a draw length from 13” up to 30”

As an adult, your draw length will stay the same.  However, kids that are still growing will be able to take advantage of the draw lengths being so versatile in the above listed bows allowing them to get comfortable with a bow and get it adjusted as they continue to grow.

The varying weights are a plus for women. It allows you to start out at a lower draw weight as you begin, then increase poundage as you grow stronger and more used to using those muscles as you continue practicing with your bow. There are many bows to choose from, but one of these could be a good place to start as you are learning the sport.

I suggest buying a bow package. That way everything you need to get started is already with the bow, instead of  buying each individual item that you need. Packages vary with the bow models, but will typically come with a: rest, quiver, sight, peep sight, wrist sling, and possibly a whisker biscuit. Some will come with a stabilizer and string stop as well.

You don't necessarily need these items on your bow and can always add them later on if you decide that you do want them. Let's take a look at what each of these do.

A stabilizer will help balance the bow and even out the weight in the front of the bow. The string stop is just what it sounds like. It stops the string from going forward after you release the arrow reducing some of the string vibration. This, in turn, seems to help reduce some of the excess noise. Neither a stabilizer nor string stop are must-haves, but are more of a personal preference.

String Stop                                 Stabilizer

string stop                         Archery - Stabilizer

 

Trophy Ridge Whisker BiscuitA whisker biscuit is a good idea to use as a rest for beginners. It holds the arrow in place, so there is less chance of the arrow slipping off the rest. You can change this out in the future for a drop away or other type of rest once, you get more comfortable shooting. The whiskers of the rest will eventually wear out as you shoot more arrows through it, so eventually you will need to replace it or buy a different rest.

 

 

The Sight - Before we talk about the sight on your bow, we need to talk about YOUR sight. You need to determine which is your dominant eye. Your dominant eye is the one that is dominant over the other when focusing on something. This will be the eye that you use to sight in your target. There is a simple tick that you can use to determine which eye is dominant.

1. Hold your hands out in front of you in a triangle placing your two index fingers together and your thumbs together.
2. Keep both eyes open and focus on a target or object about 10 yards away.
3. Close one eye then open it and then close the other then open it. The eye for which the object stays in the same place is your dominant eye.

If you have trouble with this exercise, try holding your hands in the same position as you just did and focusing on the object again with both eyes open. This time keep them open and slowly move your hands to your face while you are focusing both eyes on the object. The eye that your hands naturally go to is your dominant eye.

Your dominant eye may be the same as your dominant hand or you may be "cross eye" dominate. These means you are right-handed and left eye dominant or left-handed and right eye dominant. If you are dominant on the same hand and eye then that is the bow you will need. Ex: right eye and right hand = right handed bow. If you are cross eye dominant, you may want to try getting a bow that goes with the eye that you are dominant with, since it is easier to train your hand than your eye. If you try this, but cannot get used to it, then you will have to train your eye if you opt for a bow for your dominant hand and non-dominant eye. To do this you will have to make sure that your dominant eye is either closed when shooting or covered so that your other eye is able to focus.

Beginning Archery for Ladies - Cobra Bushwacker SightA sight has pins in it that you will use when shooting a target at different distances. The top pin will be for the closest distance and the bottom pin for the furthest distance. Different sights offer a different amount of pins. You will set the pins for about 10 yards difference in each. Some people set the first pin at 10 or 20 yards. You can also start at 10 yards and then later adjust it to 20 yards, once you become more accurate. Sight pins are typically fiber optic and some are even lighted, which helps in lower light settings. Some come with a bubble level, so you can judge when you are tilting your bow and when it is level. When you first set up your bow you will need to adjust the pins for the distances that you want, which means you will need to shoot from each distance to set each pin. Our archery experts can help you get this set up and will get the pins set as close as possible, but some tweaking may be necessary once you start shooting more accurately. Then you can tell if you are off target either up and down or right and left, which you learn by the grouping of your arrows. Example: If you are shooting tight groups (the arrows all land in the same generalG5 Meta Peep area close together), but they are always to the right of where you are shooting, then your sight needs adjusted.

A peep sight is set up in your string and is just a small circle with a hole in it. When you have your bow at full draw, it should line up at eye level, so you can look through it and line it up with the pin on your sight. There are different colors and styles to choose from on these.Quiver

 

 

A quiver is what holds your arrows when you are not shooting them. You can get one that stays attached to the bow or one that is detachable. There are also quivers that you can sling over your shoulder or clip onto your hip. Most bow packages include a quiver that mounts to the bow. The amount of arrows that a quiver can hold varies usually around 4 to 6. They just clip in fletching down with the point up in the foam to keep the tip or broadhead from cutting anything.

A wrist sling also usually comes with a package, but is not a necessary accessory. This can help prevent the archer from torquing the bow with their grip when shooting. You want a loose grip when at full draw with your fingers open and the bow resting between your thumb and index finger - resting on your palm, so you don’t flinch the bow with a tight grip. The wrist sling is attached below the grip on the bow and goes loosely around your wrist. You still want to grab your bow before it fully falls, but this allows you to let your arrow leave your bow before you grip onto your bow again (follow through). Grip it while you are pulling it back but relax your hand before you shoot your arrow.

How to grip bow

A kisser button is not a necessary accessory, but is an inexpensive one that you can add in order to help build your consistency when drawing back your bow. It helps you anchor your string in the same place every time when shooting. I recommend it for a beginning archer, since it helps you feel where your string is anchored and will get you used to anchoring in the same place. An anchor point is where you rest your hand or release every time you draw back your bow. Consistency in anchoring is important since that will increase your shooting accuracy. When drawing back the bow, you will want to place the kisser at the corner of your mouth. The person setting up your bow will set this where it needs to be for you. It will be placed above your D-loop on your string. 

                                                            Kisser button

(This picture shows the placement of the kisser button at the corner of the mouth.)

A D-Loop is something that not all archers have put on their strings, but is something that most release shooters use. It is just a small loop added on the string where you will nock your arrow and then use the loop to hook your release onto. The arrow will nock between the two knots holding the D-loop to the string.

Our archery experts can assist you in chosing the right bow for you as well as setting everything up and getting you ready to shoot. All the accessories discussed here come in a variety of styles and colors as well. Do some research on different bows and all of the other items to see what you like first, before making a final purchase. There is a lot of information available to help you make a decision on picking out what is right for you. You can also come in and talk to one of the archery experts and they will help guide you on this first step of your journey.

The example below will help show the different accessories I've discussed and where they are located at on the bow, once it has been set up.

Bear Siren set up

Next up - The Stance

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This Weekend @ Bass Pro Shops Altoona - Camp and Kayaks!

There are only three weekends and two weeks of Family Summer Camp activities left at Bass Pro Shops Altoona! Our Family Summer Camp is a perfect way to spend a hot, weekend afternoon with the kids - outdoor activities, plus our inside workshops.

Even better, it's a GREAT way to beat the heat on a weekday afternoon - kids can have fun and learn at the same time!

Schedule - June 28, 29, July 1 & 3

Free outdoor activities from noon until 5 p.m. including the Daisy BB gun range, casting, and archery.

Free crafts - Noon - 2 p.m. - Crafts change each week! This week's craft is a personal camp journal!

Homemade ice cream sampling - 5-6 p.m. on Saturday evening only

Last, but not least, our popular workshops - Each child receives a lanyard at their first workshop and a pin for each workshop they attend throughout the summer. Collect all nine pins! [Catch and Release Pond]

Workshops Schedule

Saturday, June 28
12 p.m. - Fishing
1 p.m.- Water Safety
2 p.m. - Shooting and Hunting
3 p.m. - Kayaking
4 p.m. - Birdwatching

Sunday, June 29
12 p.m. - Shooting and Hunting
1 p.m. - Archery
2 p.m. - Travel Safety
3 p.m. - Camping and Conservation
4 p.m. - Backyard Adventure

Tuesday, July 1
12 p.m. - Birdwatching
1 p.m. - Fishing
2 p.m. - Archery
3 p.m. - Kayaking
4 p.m. - Backyard Adventure

Thursday, July 3
12 p.m. - Archery
1 p.m. - Shooting and Hunting
2 p.m. - Travel safety
3 p.m. - Water Safety
4 p.m. - Camping and Conservation

Also going on this weekend:

Kayak Pool at Bass Pro Shops AltoonaKayak Pool!

Saturday and Sunday, June 28-29, Noon-5 p.m. - Our kayak pool was delayed earlier this month...now it really is back! Come try out one of our kayaks in this safe, non-threatening environment. We have the kayaks and all the gear - you bring the desire to learn about kayaking!

Saturday, June 28 - Legal Heat Concealed Carry Class - 9:30-1:30 (Uncle Buck's Private Dining Room) - Register ahead of time at www.mylegalheat.com.

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My First Hog Hunt

By Alicia Bricker, Gun Vault Specialist
 

This was my first time to hunt outside of Iowa, my first feral hog hunt, and my first muzzleloader hunt. A little nervous, very excited, and not sure what to expect…but I was ready to get back in a tree stand!  My plan was to use my bow to start, because I enjoy bow hunting over gun 

Alicia Bricker - hog hunt

hunting and I thought that it would be really neat to get a hog with my bow. Bow hunting is more rewarding to me because of the challenge and having to be closer to the game.

The first two nights I opted to hunt with my bow and was in the stand from 5 pm until dark. A few hours went by and it was hot with nothing much moving except birds, squirrels and rabbits. Then, around 8 p.m., a group of 11 hogs appeared 150 yards up the trail and laid down in the path. Eventually, they started to make their way slowly towards my tree stand and the feeder set up about 20 yards away. The feeders are set on timers all over the Chain Ranch and feed is put out once in the morning and then again in the afternoon. My feeder had gone off about an hour before I saw the hogs.

Once the hogs were at the feeder, I had to wait for one to quarter away from me. Having studied up about arrow placement on the hog, I knew that in order to get the best penetration with my bow it would require a quartering away shot. Hogs have a thick layer of something like cartilage or bone in their shoulder that helps protect them from shots. The guide showed us this when we were skinning one. Some people think it is an extra bone, a “shield,” but it is actually not a part of their skeleton at all. It is in their hide. I had drawn my bow once, but the hogs move around quickly and often, so when I lost the shot opportunity before placing the shot I had to bring it down again. A few minutes later the largest hog in the group lined up perfectly to give me a good clean shot. He was quartering away by the feeder that was on the same side as my tree stand, so I took the shot. With a lumenock on my arrow with Montec G5 broadheads, I was able to see the shot placement clearly. But, the hog started to move as I released, so the arrow struck a little further back than I had hoped and the hog took off squealing into the brush. Later, our guide confirmed it was a good shot and one that would hit vitals. After the adrenaline rush had settled a bit, I called the guide and he let me know that he would be on the way. Hogs can be extremely dangerous, especially when wounded, so I was to stay in my stand until he got there. He and my boyfriend, Danny McCain, were tracking a hog that Danny had shot with his bow about an hour previously. A little after dark they both arrived, having backed out until morning from tracking Danny’s hog as it had taken off further into the brush. We took off in search of my hog.

Once we located the blood trail, we could tell that my arrow had penetrated both sides of the hog. However, the arrow had still been in him when he ran, so I knew it hadn’t been a complete pass through. There was a clear blood trail to follow up the hill and into the brush; once the hog crested the hill the blood trail went cold and we could find no more trace. After losing the blood trail, we decided to back out for the night and come back in the morning to look after our morning hunt.

A cool tracking tip that the guide showed us was using ants to help…there are a lot of ants in Oklahoma! If the ants are on the blood, then the blood is not too fresh, meaning that you are not on blood that the hog has just lost. If you come up on blood and the ants haven’t found it yet, then the hog is most likely still alive and you should back out until later, so you don’t spook the hog back up. Our guide always carried a pistol for tracking just in case this happened.  

The next morning, we set out before sunrise, but hadn’t seen any hogs, so we went back to track both hogs from the day before. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to pick up any new blood trails and could not find either hog. Disappointment began to set in, but the guide reassured us that this happens often...the hogs are hard to kill - they get an adrenaline kick when they are shot and just seem to keep going forever.

We set up the next night, in different tree stands this time. Once again, it was about an hour before dark when the first hog appeared, but it was a momma sow with some babies. Hog HuntInstead of shooting with my bow, I shot some pictures instead! Then a second group of around 10 came out, but didn’t come into range. That night I went without a shot. Danny had shot a big hog weighing in at 250 lbs. It was impressive with big tusks and a ridge on its back - a very intimidating looking hog. A shot with his muzzleloader right behind the ear dropped it in its tracks around 7 p.m. Our guide picked us both up and we went back to the lodge where they have a very nice facility available for cleaning the hogs, along with an ice machine and a walk in cooler to store the hogs.

The next morning Danny and I hunted together. We wanted to make our way in to a shooting house close to a water hole, but time ran out, so we set up in a tall wheat field. There were several hogs out in the open field, but I couldn’t get a clear shot. They were either too far away, since my shooting range comfort zone right now is 100 yards, or they were too concealed in the tall wheat. I’m still new to a muzzleloader and don’t feel completely steady with one yet. Hogs move faster than many people probably realize. So, I didn’t get one that morning either, but it was still fun to see all of them moving back into the brush for the day.

That evening was my last chance. This was where my plans changed. It was make or break to get a hog, so I switched to my muzzleloader. Instead of a 20–30 yard range limit with a bow, I could shoot up to 100 yards with a muzzleloader and I wouldn’t have to wait for that quartering away shot. I appreciate the challenge of the muzzleloader, as well, considering that you only have the one shot, compared to a rifle, and they are much more of a struggle to reload quickly. So I brought it along in case I got down to the last minute and still hadn’t harvested one. Well, this was the last minute.

It was extremely hot -  over 100 degrees - with absolutely no breeze. Our guide told us this time of year is tough, since hogs don’t like to move much when it’s hot. He suggested a cooler time of year - the cooler the better for hog hunting. We set up in a shooting house that evening by the water hole where we had watched the hogs pass by that morning. There was a little piglet in the watering hole when we arrived and it stayed there throughout the evening. He became our entertainment because every so often he would get up and push the mud around and then settle back in when he decided it was comfortable enough. I was starting to get worried - at 8:30 p.m. there was still no sign of hogs. This was, by far, the hottest evening yet that we had hunted, and without a breeze to help cool things off the hogs weren’t stirring. It was getting close to 9 p.m. and the sun was getting closer and closer to setting when finally…a hog came running in across the field! He was quite a ways out, so I set my muzzleloader up, propped it on the window’s ledge, and waited and watched as the hog approached. We used the range finder and when he stopped at about 100 yards I lined up my shot. He was facing towards me – he wasn’t going to make this easy, and then finally he turned broadside. As soon as he gave me his shoulder I fired. I was antsy, waiting for the smoke to clear so I could see him. He had let out a crazy sounding squeal and was spinning in circles with his front legs flat beneath him and then, all of a sudden, he took off. I was surprised that he had gotten back up and he was moving fast. I tried to quickly reload my gun but was struggling. I needed to hurry and my adrenaline was still pumping from the first shot! Danny ran out the back of the shooting house with his muzzleloader and took a shot at the running hog and it went down. YAY! I had gotten my hog.

We went to check him out and my shot had gone right behind the shoulder blade through the heart and lungs, so a good clean shot. But, being as stubborn as they are, he still had the power to keep going. Danny’s shot had put him down, hitting him in the hindquarters and knocking them out from under him. It was a good shot considering how fast the hog was moving in the tall grass and that he didn’t have anything to help steady the gun for his shot. I was definitely impressed, but happy that my shot had still been the kill shot. We called the guide and he came to help us load up. He was just as happy as I was - he knew that it was my first hog hunt and was really trying his best to help me get one. My hog was 100 lbs.

It was a great experience. If you’re looking for something new and exciting to try during the hunting off season I would recommend checking out the Chain Ranch if you are looking for a great place to go that is also affordable. We saw several hogs every day and many of them big. They have a great set up, know what they’re doing, take great care of their hunters and there is more to do there than just hog hunts.

It was a hunt of firsts that I will never forget and I look forward to another hog hunt sometime...when it's colder.

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Shot placement tips on hogs:

With a gun, if you are accurate enough, shoot right behind the ear through the spine. It will drop the hog in its tracks. A gun will also go through the “shield” over their shoulder.

With an arrow, the ideal shot is right behind the shoulder blade, low (since the heart sits low), and quartering away from you. Also, a helpful hint from our guide was if you can shoot them again do it. Most of the time they will just keep going even on a great shot.

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This Weekend @ Bass Pro Shops Altoona

Family summer Camp 2014

Family Summer Camp Schedule - June 21, 22, 24, and 26

Free outdoor activities from noon until 5 p.m. including the Daisy BB gun range, casting, and archery.

Free crafts - Noon - 2 p.m. - Crafts change each week! This week's craft is:

Homemade ice cream sampling - 5-6 p.m. on Saturday evening only

Last, but not least, our popular workshops - Each child receives a lanyard at their first workshop and a pin for each workshop they attend throughout the summer. Collect all nine pins! [Catch and Release Pond]

Workshops Schedule

Saturday, June 21
12 p.m. - Fishing
1 p.m.- Water Safety
2 p.m. - Shooting and Hunting
3 p.m. - Kayaking
4 p.m. - Birdwatching

Sunday, June 22
12 p.m. - Shooting and Hunting
1 p.m. - Archery
2 p.m. - Travel Safety
3 p.m. - Camping and Conservation
4 p.m. - Backyard Adventure

Tuesday, June 24
12 p.m. - Birdwatching
1 p.m. - Fishing
2 p.m. - Archery
3 p.m. - Kayaking
4 p.m. - Backyard Adventure

Thursday, June 26
12 p.m. - Archery
1 p.m. - Shooting and Hunting
2 p.m. - Travel safety
3 p.m. - Water Safety
4 p.m. - Camping and Conservation

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Repurposing Product Spotlight - Fun Noodles

We often have customers come in looking for specific products. But it's not always for the way WE think they should be used. So we're going to try to keep tabs on some of the unique uses our customers, and employees, have for some of the products sold at Bass Pro Shops.

The product I'd like to feature is the fun noodle or water noodle. Water noodles, for those unfamiliar, are giant tubular foam floats. Kids and adults can use them for summer fun floating in lakes, pools, or at the beach. There are also probably more than just a few kids (especially old kids) who have conducted water wars and whacked each other in battle with the water noodle.

However, here are three other ideas our customers have shared with us:Photo from rvtip.com

1. One of the most popular is for RV campers. If you have an RV that has a slide-out on it, you can protect the corners of the slide from damage simply by using a water noodle. Plus, it will protect little heads from hitting the corners, if they are running by the camper. Cut the noodle into smaller sections, about a foot or so, then slice down one side of the section. Snap the noodles onto both sides of the corner and you have just used your noodle to protect a noodle!

2. Rubber Baby Buggy Bumpers - Not really. More like "Foam Car Garage Bumpers."  Cut a water noodle in half lengthwise and secure half to the garage wall next to where your car door will be opening. Saves on the door dings! 

3. Hurdle Practice - We had a gentleman who came in and purchased about 15 water noodles. We found out that he was purchasing them to help his granddaughter learn how to run hurdles for track. He was going to cut and secure the noodles between PVC pipes and use the noodles as the crossbar for her to jump over. The noodles would be much easier on her knees and shins, easing the pain if she hits the crossbars while training.

So there are your first three repurposing ideas.

What do you repurpose?

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