Pursuit Tactical Defense Light

The Pursuit Tactical Defense Light is a high-powered flashlight emitting 220 lumens of blinding light in a tightly focused beam with sufficient peripheral lighting as well. A self-locking adjustable mount makes it easy to attach the Pursuit Defense Light directly to barrels of tactical rifles and shotguns, no tools required; the mount features an accessory rail mount for additional accessories. The Pursuit Tactical Light comes with a dual-mode pressure switch attachment with cable that allows you to activate the light and control the 4 lighting modes (100% light, 50% light, 10% light, and Defensive Strobe) from a normal shooting position. A fixed tail cap enables this Tactical Defense Light to be used without the pressure switch attachment as a normal flashlight. Made of water- and impact-resistant anodized aluminum, the Pursuit Tactical Defense Light will withstand years of rugged use. Runs on 3 AAA batteries (included).

  • Dual-mode pressure switch
  • Can be used as simple flashlight
  • Powered by 3 AAA batteries (included)
  • 4 lighting modes

Mounts easily on 12 or 20 gauge shotguns and most scopes or rifles. This is an item folks have been asking for months that is affordable and has the mounting hardware needed to attach to their firearm. Stop by and get yours before they sell out!

 

 

0 Comments »

Coming Clean About MSR’s

Those of you with MSRs (Modern Sporting Rifles) have probably had the misfortune of experiencing a jammed or double fed round. The most common culprit of this issue is a dirty weapon.  More so than other firearms, proper cleaning is key to enjoying a day out on the range, or having peace of mind known that your weapon will function properly when it needs to.

First you will want to fully break down your rifle. Since not all MSR’s are the same, you will want to consult your user’s manual if you are unsure about how to do this. Most bolt systems will look like this. MSRs are notoriously dirty. The carbon from the rounds you shoot finds its way to all parts of your rifle. To remove this carbon you need a carbon cleaner as either an all-in-one, or a stand-alone cleaner such as Hoppes Elite Gun Cleaner

Cleaning the barrel - If you look down your barrel, you will notice a lot of carbon deposits down your barrel. First you want to run a wire brush with the cleaner on it though your barrel to scrape any stuck on deposits. Be sure to pull the brush through in the same direction as the bullet. After doing this a few times, follow up by using some cleaning patches. Keep using the patches until they come out clean. Now when you look down the barrel, it should be shiny, clean, and spotless. If you find yourself having a hard time seeing down the barrel, try this: Point the barrel at a light in the room or try one of these.

Breech aka “Star Chamber” – This is usually the hardest and most time consuming area to clean. It is also one of the most important areas since a dirty breech prevents the bolt from going in battery, and also prevents rounds from properly feeding causing those jams. There are several different methods in cleaning this depending on what you have to use. Just like with the barrel, you will want to make sure to hit it with some cleaner first.  Next you want to find a method that works for you to remove the carbon. Hoppe's Chamber Brush accomplishes this really well, as does using a pick. If you are without these try using a pipe cleaner to get those hard to reach places or use a dirtier method and get in there with some cleaning patches and your pinky finger. Once this is clean, a very light coat of oil will help keep carbon from crusting on during your next use.

The Bolt Assembly – With the hard part out of the way, you will want to focus on cleaning the many pieces of the bolt assembly.  Many of these can be simply wiped down with a patch and your cleaning solution. Use a pick if necessary if there are some tough spots and run a pipe cleaner through the bolt where your firing pin goes. If you are using a gas operated system, pay special attention to tube on top of your bolt carrier that connects to your gas tube. Carbon that travels down your gas tube will collect here, and it is a usually over looked area for cleaning. Get in there with picks or pipe cleaners. Once the assembly is clean, coat everything in a light layer of oil just as you did with the breech.

Buffer spring – Cleaning the Buffer Spring is often overlooked. The whole assembly is usually held in place by a pin and can be removed when that pin is pushed down. Wipe the Buffer and spring down with a rag that has your cleaning solution on it and follow up with wiping down the tube that the spring slides into.

Other areas – You can spot clean the rest of the firearm. Use brushes and rags to remove any other dirt on the exterior or in the magazine well. Pipe cleaners once again work great for cleaning any dust or dirt out of the trigger assembly. You do not have to go too far in depth in cleaning the trigger assembly, but removing the excess dirt and grime keeps your trigger functioning correctly.

With this these tips, your next hunt or range trip with hopefully go without failure. A clean rifle will be more accurate and function better than one that hasn’t been properly cleaned. If you have any questions, feel free to come into the hunting department at your local Bass Pro Shops and ask an associate. Happy Hunting!

 

Written by Michael Steiner, Hunting Team Lead

 

0 Comments »

Broadheads and Turkey Hunting

.

Turkey season is rapidly approaching! Missouri will open for youth season on April 11th and 12th. The primary Spring Turkey season will open April 20th and go through May 10th. For you Kansas hunters out there, the archery only season opens up on the 6th of April and runs through the 14th. Archery/firearm will run April 15th through May 31st. Time to get your bow tuned up, check your arrows, broadheads and camo gear!!  A little preparation now will go a long way towards success and gives you that extra confidence in your equipment!

Now granted, there are more than a few that prefer to hunt turkeys with a shotgun…I get that, but there are those completely hardheaded individuals such as myself that will inevitably find themselves gravitating towards pursuing these challenging birds with a bow. With that undertaking, the difficulty greatly intensifies. The subtle movements and smooth swing of that shotgun barrel are exchanged for the motions of panning and/or drawing your bow to anchor at the same time. Oftentimes having to adjust your height or body position to clear limbs and surrounding brush. It’s a trial in patience. But the reward is worth the frustrations!  I’m going to run through a few broadheads, old and new, that will ensure clean, quick kills when that opportunity arises.

There is an increasing market for broadheads akin to the now famous Arrowdynamic Guillotine™ broadhead (SKU#’s 1346231, 1346213). These include the Tom Bomb™  from  Flying Arrow Archery, the Turkey D-Cap™ from Solid Broadheads , Turkey Tearror™ from American Broadhead and Rage Turkey™(SKU# 1875509)to name a few. Each offer insane cutting diameters and/or massive wound channels.  These are fantastic broadheads for that neck or headshot.

Not all will fly and perform the same though. Many of the drastic blade designs will require the extra stabilization of a Flu Flu arrow such as the Carbon Express(SKU# 1690454) or Gold Tip’s Twister (SKU#’s 2006844, 2013190, 2006842). Shooting a standard blazer will greatly decrease the accuracy you will want to make such a precise shot with large surface area broadheads. Blades such as the Turkey Tearror and Rage broadheads have lower bearing surface area’s and will do fine  with standard fletchings.

Regardless of the broadhead you choose, whether it be some new monstrosity or an old single edged 2 blade, there’s no substitute for good shot placement. Take your time and make some awesome memories!

Check out these other great articles!

Bow Hunting Gobblers

Spring Turkey Techniques


A. Herzog

ARCHERY TEAM LEAD

Independence, Missouri

0 Comments »

Dressed to kill: Spring Turkey Hunt Edition

              

Turkey hunting is a pleasurable and exciting form of hunting.  Confronting turkeys is what hunters live for to have that exhilarating conversations with fellow hunters, family and friends.

Turkey Season is April 22nd thru May 10th with a bag limit of one bearded or male turkey for the spring season. To be able to hunt wild turkey, a valid hunting license and a valid game bird habit stamp privilege are required. But a separate turkey license is required when hunting during each turkey hunting season.

Getting ready for turkey hunting after you have your license, calls, firearms, and anything else you need for your hunt, you need to have proper attire when going out on the field. You want to make sure you are covered head to foot in camouflage to blend in with the environment as best as possible. You don’t need to worry about scent control with the turkeys but you do need to make sure you cover your face, hands and anything else exposed to cover up. Starting from top to bottom you need a hat or a leafy hat with a spandex ¼ face mask to cover your head, face and neck. Next, you need to wear lightweight breathable shirts and pants, like the stalker lite series comes in long sleeve shirts, ¼ zip pullover, pants and shorts for what you prefer. It’s a lightweight, moisture wicking, breathable and rugged material. There is also a Tec-Lite style that comes in a long-sleeve button up shirt and pants. This style is breathable, moisture wicking and durable with the rip-stop material made to stop the tear from spreading. There is also strut zone turkey gloves that are spandex gloves and are lightweight, moisture wicking and breathable that you will need to cover your hands.

There is nothing fun about sitting out there waiting for your turkey and you don’t have the proper attire on and you’re uncomfortable or the turkey sees you. Once you are all covered, have your license and all your necessities you are ready for your turkey hunting season. Just make sure you are all covered so the turkey doesn’t see you.

0 Comments »

Cool Calibers: 357 Sig

Whenever one is discussing firearms and hears “357” they usually finish with “Magnum”. The 357 Magnum is one of the most popular calibers of handguns and has had a strong-loyal following for years. I have even heard people say that a house is not complete without a 357 revolver in it. While other handgun calibers can produce better ballistics, people still swing towards this round. Being able to shoot the lighter-recoil 38 Special, availability of information/ ammunition and almost an Americana aspect for the caliber keeps this round cooking.

But this time around the “357” is followed by “Sig”. The 357 Sig is a much newer round when compared to other pistol calibers, but it has grown its own die-hard fans.

The 357 Sig was created by two legendary companies in the arms business, Sig Sauer and Federal Ammunition. Developed in 1994, the basic goal was to give specific ballistic performances found in the 357 Magnum but be able to be fired from a semi-auto pistol.

In the shooting world you have pistol-guys and revolver-guys, and of course the good ol’ guys like me who enjoy everything! Revolver-guys swear their handgun is more reliable and accurate and pistol-guys preach how they can carry more rounds and have lighter weapons. Both sides have their own valid arguments, but here are my two-cents: shoot what you like and what you can shoot accurately and comfortably.

For a long time police officers used revolvers as their service weapon. Then when polymer/high-capacity pistols came out there was a big switch. But many shooters found the 9mm round “too weak”, so the two parent companies had a great idea when it came to making the 357 Sig. That “bigger bang” that revolver fans like and the “higher capacity” that pistol fans enjoy. This round in fact was the first modern bottleneck commercial handgun cartridge since the early 1960s. After its success, others tried to create their own similar wildcat calibers but never reached the success the 357 Sig has.

It competes against the 40S&W, which has been losing popularity steadily over the past few years. Online there is common chatter about being able to convert a pistol that shoots 40 S&W to 357 Sig quite easily, but I do not suggest this. To me a firearm is a tool and has a specific purpose. You wouldn’t buy a portable band-saw only to learn about swapping out a gear to then make it into a plasma cutter and do so. Very obscure analogy but it works and I think this may have been the first time I have gotten to reference a portable band-saw in my 250+ blogs I have written now.

As far as recoil goes it is about the same as the 40 S&W but less than that of the 10mm and 357 Magnum. It shoots at a higher velocity than other pistol calibers which gives it a longer effective range. Since the cartridge has a bottleneck shape, extraction errors are rarely experienced. But because of all of this the handgun firing it must be able to handle those higher pressures. (Another reason why not to simply convert a different pistol.)

Now before you run out and get one, keep in mind that ammunition for this caliber can be hard to find. At our store it is usually not a “permanent fixture” on the shelves and its seems to be the same at other retailers. It will show up, get to our shelves and sit for a while and then BOOM it all gets purchased at one time. Thanks though to the internet, acquiring rounds is much easier than it was years ago.

Sig first utilized the round in their P229 pistol. As usual, shooters and organizations were hesitant to adopt a new firearm, especially one with a new caliber. In 1998, the first government agency to deploy this caliber was the Texas DPS. It was the solitary choice of pistol for commissioned officers. Following that, dozens of other agencies have adopted this caliber. Police departments in Tennessee, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Ohio, Mississippi, South Carolina, West Virginia, New York, North Carolina, Missouri, New Mexico and more all use the 357 Sig.

-Giddy-Up!!

Other Caliber Related Blogs:

What We Would Take

Gunnin’ for Moose

7mm-08 Remington

0 Comments »

Browning BAR LongTrac

When it comes to the world’s history, firearms have played a major role. The history of the United States alone is one full of firearm heritage. Anyone who owns a historical firearm will tell you that you can almost feel the history when holding it. The NRA has a museum with firearms that have literally changed history. The NRA museum that was recently built inside the Springfield Bass Pro Shops has its own impressive arsenal. Specific firearms themselves can bring a multitude of emotions when mentioned. Winchester Model 94, Colt 1911 and AK47 all have impacted history in one way or another. One of the more under-acknowledged guns to me though, would be the BAR.

BAR stands for Browning Automatic Rifle, and currently I am talking specifically about the M1918. It was a military automatic rifle/light machine gun chambered in .30-06 Sprg. Anyone who has shot a .30-06 Sprg could only imagine what it would be like to shoot one that has a 20 round magazine and automatic fire. Quite impressive as was the service life of this firearm. It was used in World War Two, Korea and for a little bit in Vietnam. It is a highly sought after firearm and collectors will pay huge bucks for one. It is an iconic weapon that has earned its place in history and our hearts. (As a running joke my best friend’s dad said he wanted to name his son after the firearm.)

Now not your average hunter or shooter can afford the thousands of dollars it takes to own an original BAR. Luckily Browning has been producing a civilian/hunting version of the BAR rifle for years. Unlike the original M1918, these rifles are a semi-auto. They have been chambered in standard hunting calibers: 270 Win, 300 Win, 243 Win, 308 Win and 30-06 Sprg.

Browning is currently offering a BAR LongTrac in .270 Win, .30-06 Sprg and .300 Win. As they state their guns “are rugged, reliable hunting rifles, capable of cycling magnum cartridges, providing you the firepower needed to bring down any big game species in North America.” These guns are gas operated and utilize “a 7-lug bolt that locks directly into the barrel, giving it incredible strength, while providing exceptional accuracy. A buffering mechanism reduces wear and stress on the rifle's receiver for longer life and greater reliability”.

To many a gun is just a tool and to others it is a piece of art. This firearm provides both. It has beautiful walnut wood in the buttstock and forend. It also has a safety in the standard location for most semi-auto shotguns, making it a breeze to engage/disengage while maintaining proper grip. The floorplate is also hinged, giving access to the detachable magazine that much easier.

I would personally love to pick one up in the .30-06 Sprg. I already have a Remington 700 chambered in this caliber and my wife enjoys shooting it. This way we can consolidate calibers while adding to our collection. And while it might not be the original BAR, I am sure I would still feel part of the firearm’s impressive history. And I can always use it in the future to teach my son about how important firearms have been to history and why the United States is the greatest country in the world.

-Giddy-Up!!

PS- While .30-06 Sprg might be a little big for predator hunting I have known to use bigger.

0 Comments »

Airsoft 3-Gun Expo at Bass Pro!

When you look at the world of shooting sports there are dozens of different activities. There is skeet, trap, action-clays, defensive pistol, long range rifle, silhouettes, IDPA, cowboy action and many more. One sport that has been growing tremendously over the past years has been 3-Gun shooting. This is known as a “practical shooting” event where the shooter transitions from pistol, rifle and shotgun. Hence the “3-Gun” name. While many adults find this sport extremely fun and engaging, it can be harder to get the youth involved. But where there is a will there is a way and that’s when airsoft can save the day.

Airsoft is where one can shoot spherical non-metallic pellets out of guns that are replicas of traditional firearms. In no way should these be considered toys and safety should always be the main focus when handling them. What many people think of just simple “plastic toys” have evolved to be full metal replications. Certain airsoft guns will weigh the same as their origins and feature blow-back to replicate recoil.

The local non-profit group Shoot Right AZ will actually be holding an airsoft 3-gun expo at our store on Saturday March 21st, 2015. It will start at 9AM and run until 5PM. We have been working with this organization for several years and even wrote a blog about them back in 2013.

They will hold several clinics/seminars going over the basics of 3-Gun Shooting, rules, safety and more. There will be a 3-Gun setup where participants can actually hold and shoot the different airsoft guns. It won’t be as intense as a normal 3-Gun competition, but it will be just as fun. It is geared towards kids ages 10 and up and all adults are more than welcome to participate as well. There will be a $5 fee for participants and they or a legal guardian will have to fill out a waiver as well.

This is a great way to possibly discover a new passion. Not only will it teach gun safety but also “practical” aspects of handling them. Kids will love the experience and parents will love the cost difference between BB’s and ammunition. Just always be sure to get “Bio-BBs” as they are way more eco-friendly than the other kind.

And that is one thing that Shoot Right AZ covers, is our responsibility to others and the environment. We hope to see you out there! I know I will be!

-Giddy-Up!!

0 Comments »

Check it Out List: Reloading

This month’s Check it Out List is about a topic that I find fascinating, as do many others. I am also interested in getting into it now more-than-ever, as are many others. With the ammo shortages, the slow but steadily rise in prices and ever-changing policies over the past few years one can never know if or when they might be able to acquire rounds. Now the ammo-craze that we were in a couple years ago definitely has calmed down, but it is harder to get certain calibers. 22 ammo will probably never be something you can just grab off the shelves “because it is always there” ever again, but other calibers are not always completely wiped out. But with the possibility of that craze coming back and people looking to be more self-sufficient, the amount of people reloading has definitely increased!

Basically reloading is the act of making your own ammunition. There are different levels of reloading and all sorts of ways to do it. Some people collect spent cases from their own/others use at a gun range and others purchase them factory new. Some people make their own bullets for fun and others to save money. Some calibers are so uncommon that you may have to learn to reload in order to actually shoot it. (Ever seen .280 Ackley commercially made?) Others try to figure out how to get the most performance out of their firearm by loading their ammo to certain specifications. Some people learn because to them it is an essential skill. No matter what though, you’ll need some supplies to get started. Shall we?

Reloading

Press

Dies

Shell Holder/Plate

Powder Measuring/Dispensing Device

Scale

Case Trimmer

Case Tumbler

Dial Caliper

Bullet Puller

Loading Block

Data/Information

 

Now to get started all you really need are the first three items and the last one. Probably more so than any other item you need to have Data/Information. This is something that you cannot start on just a whim. Safety needs to be your primary focus all the time with reloading. You’ll want to have a safe place to load and store your materials. You’ll definitely want to know how to load safely. And you’ll want to keep your loads to the data out there first. You can experiment with different loads later, stick to the basics at the beginning. Get yourself books on the subject and join an online club. Do everything at your disposal to have a safe and solid understanding of reloading before you start.

The press is going to be the main workhorse of your operation. You can start off with a simple single-press or go all the way to a multi-stage set. Both kinds have their own advantages, but I always suggest starting with the basics. (It is also cheaper.) Your dies will be specific to whatever caliber you are loading. You can’t use a .30 caliber die for reloading .45ACP and so on. The shell plate will be what holds the casing as you load. Also caliber specific. This would be where consolidating calibers that you own can be a big help.

Things like a tumbler, bullet puller, case trimmer, dial caliper or a scale are extras, which over time can prove to be extremely important.  A loading block is a device that holds numerous cases in to help with reloading. These can be purchased or made at home. Just as a heads up, you probably won’t find any cute ideas for them on Pintrest.

The little history I had with reloading was back in high school. My buddy’s grandfather owned an auto shop. He is also a vendor for the huge machine gun shoots we hold in Arizona every year. He has anything and everything, ranging from G36K’s to .50cals. With the amount they shoot up there, reloading is the only option to afford the ammo. I needed some brake work done, so we swapped labor for labor. I paid for the parts and built ammo belts for M249s for the work on my truck. Solid trade.

Now please note that this blog is more about what you will need to get into reloading as opposed to how to reload. For that, you need to do your research. Like I said earlier, having a safe and solid understanding of the process is extremely important.

-Giddy-Up!!

Checked-Lists

Picnics Gun Cleaning Game Care First Aid Kayaking Day Pack Trip Prep Range Time

Fishing Pack Boating Day Trip Camp Cooking  Dove Hunting Upland Hunting Tactical Clothing

Winter Camping

0 Comments »

Freshwater Fish Conservation Month

February means Spring Fishing Classic and the return of our donation month directly related to fishing.

Freshwater Fish Conservation Month

Did You Know?

  • More Americans fish than play basketball (24.0 million) and football (8.9 million) combined.
  • Fishing as a leisure-time activity ranks higher than playing golf, target shooting, hunting with firearms, backpacking and wilderness camping, baseball, mountain biking and skiing.
    (Statistics from the National Fish Habitat Action Plan, 2nd Edition)

A $2 donation helps keep our streams, rivers, and habitat healthy for fish and keeps our next generation fishing! All donations will be matched by the Johnny Morris Conservation Creel of the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.


Where Do the Donations Go?
The donations go to The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF), which has supported thousands of conservation programs across the U.S. since 1985, including freshwater fish conservation programs designed to:

  • Educate the general public regarding the perils facing our fish populations.
  • Motivate people to support the cause of freshwater fish conservation.
  • Use the donations received to fund various initiatives around the country toward improving fish habitat, species health, etc.

What Does it Mean for Iowa?
Here is a sample of projects that have benefitted in Iowa:

  • Raccoon River Valley Restoration
  • TreeKeepers program
  • Iowa Buffer and Declining Habitat Programs in several Iowa counties
  • Cooperative Conservation for Watershed Health
  • Nutrient Soil and Habitat Management in Upper Cedar Watersheds
  • Upper Iowa River restoration and education
  • Managing Biodiversity in the Iowa and Cedar River Valley
  • Engaging landowners in farm bills affecting the Driftless Region of NE Iowa

For research how the NFWF benefits your state, check out their interactive map!

____________________________

Like us @  Bass Pro Shops Altoona
Visit us @ www.basspro.com/altoona
Tweet us @bassproaltoona
Pin us @ pinterest.com/bpsaltoona
View us @ 
youtube.com/bassproshopsaltoona
Picture us @ instagram.com/bassproshops_altoona

0 Comments »

Cool Calibers: 7mm-08 Remington

When you look at a lot of things in the world, it seems like one thing should work for everyone. Hats say “One size fits all” and products might state that “every household needs one”. One area though that is definitely not “one size fits all” is firearms. When you begin to look at all the different types, models, calibers, sizes and materials in the firearm world it can be quite overwhelming. There is single action, bolt action, pump action, smooth bore, big-bore, wood stock, synthetic stock and so much more to consider. Luckily when you begin to look at the purpose of why you want a firearm the field begins to get narrowed down. You aren’t going to buy a long gun to keep on your night stand for home protection and you wouldn’t even consider going out to hunt Alaskan brown bear with a single action rim-fire revolver.

While there may be some pretty standard calibers out there, we are always looking and working on new rounds with better velocities or knockdown power. And so to break from the mundane of “standard calibers” we are going to be look at some of the less common ones. And to begin we are going to start with a rifle caliber that has intrigued me since I first heard about, the 7mm-08 Remington.

The 7mm-08 Remington got its start back in 1958. Originally it was a wildcat cartridge known as the 7mm/308. Decades later Remington began to produce rifles in this caliber commercially and attached their name to it, hence giving us the 7mm-08 Remington. It is a center fire rifle cartridge that has been growing in popularity.

Going back real quick, a wildcat cartridge is where a commercially produced cartridge is modified to get better certain performance characteristics. These characteristics could include velocity, efficiency, size or knockdown power. Sometimes a wildcat cartridge goes mainstream while many others find themselves a very small but loyal following. Always consider availability of ammunition before purchasing any kind of caliber, as you may have to take up the art of reloading in order to actually shoot.

Back to the cartridge. The 7mm-08 is basically a .308 Winchester case that is necked down to fit a 7mm bullet. This round lends itself to several different kinds of shooting including: long range, silhouettes, varmint hunting and some game-hunting. It is growing in popularity for hunting African plains game as well. It has a trajectory similar to that of a .270 Winchester. It does fly flatter than the more popular .308Win and .30-06 Springfield.

It is a good choice for younger, older and female shooters as it has less recoil than the .308. Now please do not take any offense at that statement as I am none of those and am interested in this round. It is a great caliber to hunt the medium-sized game here in North America and is even an acceptable round to hunt moose with in Europe.

Most major rifle manufacturers do offer a couple options of products in the 7mm-08 caliber. Hornady, Remington and some other ammunition manufacturers also produce the caliber commercially. Of course the best way to figure out if this would be a good caliber for you, is to test it out. Talk to your friends or get online to a forum and just ask around. Because it has been increasing in popularity, chances are you might just be able to get your hands on one to test. Either way, the 7mm-08 is definitely a cool caliber.

Giddy-Up!!

Other Caliber Related Blogs:

What We Would Take

Gunnin’ for Moose

1 Comments »

Think Camo!

                                                                                                                        

SHE Outdoor is a rugged hunting line for women that is stylish with a feminine cut. The way it fits with the right material makes it functional and durable for that outdoor hunt. Also with SHE Outdoor apparel and it's proper fitting clothing, now women can be more comfortable in it, to have that proper movement. Women will now be able to climb tree stands, bow hunt, use firearms and to be able to even just walk.

    SHE Outdoor is offered in a styles to meet every need of every hunting atmosphere and activity. When it comes down to it women now have a lot more to choose from to be able to be ready and prepared for what's to come out in the field.

                                                                                                                 

    There is now plenty to choose from when getting dressed and ready to hit the road, from light weight, mid-weight and heavy weight clothing options. SHE Outdoor heavyweight has a Insulated Jacket that are waterproof, breathable, lined hand warmer pockets and detached hood with adjustable draw-cords. Insulated waterproof and breathable pants include knee high side-leg zippers with exterior storm flap, hook n' loop closure ankle adjustments and back pockets with magnetic storm flap. A mid-weight option is the insulated bibs or jacket, the bibs have 2 hand warmer pockets, 2 button down rear pockets, reinforced knees and kick plate and 2 upper zipper bellowed chest pockets. The insulated jacket has a hook n loop adjustment cuffs, 2 ykk zippered hand warmer pockets and 3 panel draw cord hood and waste.

SHE also has a fleece full-zippered jacket and a pullover hoodie for the little extra coverage you might need. There is plenty to choose from in the light-weight items, the SHE enduraskin is moisture wicking and compression fit. The SHE tech shirts are odor control, loose fit that's polyester and breathable that comes in short sleeve or long sleeve.

0 Comments »

Wild Turkey

License Requirements

To hunt wild turkey, a valid turkey hunting license and a valid game bird habitat stamp privilege are required.

Those that have a lifetime comprehensive hunting, lifetime comprehensive hunting and fishing, or resident youth hunt/trap license can hunt turkey and do not need to purchase the game bird habitat stamp because it is included with those license types.

A separate turkey hunting license is required when hunting during each turkey hunting season — one for the spring season and one for the fall season.

Game bird habitat stamp privileges are good for both spring and fall seasons in the same calendar year.

You can assist another hunter by calling only if you are licensed to hunt turkeys, regardless of whether or not you have harvested a turkey yourself.

Season and Bag Limits

Spring 2015 - The spring season is April 22 through May 10, 2015. The bag limit is one bearded or male turkey for the spring season. Spring turkey hunting is allowed statewide.

Fall 2014 - The bag and possession limit for the fall seasons is one bird of either sex, regardless of hunting equipment used or what portion of the season. Fall archery season is statewide. Fall firearm season has specific dates for specific counties (see below).

  • Fall archery (including crossbows):
    Statewide from Oct. 1 – 26, 2014 and Dec. 6, 2014 to Jan. 4, 2015.
  • Fall firearm: Oct. 15 – 19, 2014 in the following counties only:
    • DeKalb, LaGrange, LaPorte, Marshall, St. Joseph, Starke, Steuben.
  • Fall firearm: Oct. 15 – 26, 2014 in the following counties only:
    • Bartholomew, Brown, Clark, Clay, Crawford, Daviess, Dearborn, Dubois, Fayette, Floyd, Fountain, Franklin, Gibson, Greene, Harrison, Jackson, Jefferson, Jennings, Knox, Lawrence, Martin, Monroe, Morgan, Ohio, Orange, Owen, Parke, Perry, Pike, Posey, Putnam, Ripley, Scott, Spencer, Sullivan, Switzerland, Union, Vanderburgh, Vermillion, Vigo, Warren, Warrick, Washington.

Youth Season

Information about the youth season is on page 13.

Legal Equipment

Turkeys can be hunted only with:

  • A 10-, 12-, 16- or 20-gauge shotgun loaded with pellets of size No. 4, 5, 6, 7 or 7½.
  • A muzzleloading shotgun not smaller than 20-gauge and not larger than 10-gauge, loaded with pellets of size No. 4, 5, 6, 7 or 7½. Combination loads using shot sizes other than these are illegal.
  • Bow and arrow
  • A crossbow

Hunting Hours

Wild turkeys may be hunted only from one-half hour before sunrise to sunset. All DNR-managed Fish and Wildlife Areas, Mississinewa and Salamonie lakes have spring season hunting hours one-half hour before sunrise until noon for properties on CDT and until 1 p.m. for properties on EDT. Call the property for additional information.

Tagging & Checking

Immediately upon killing a turkey, the hunter must complete a temporary transportation tag on paper stating the hunter’s full name, address, sex of the turkey, license number (if applicable), and the date the turkey was taken before transporting the turkey from the field.

The hunter must register the turkey at an official check station or online through the CheckIN Game system (www.CheckINgame.DNR.IN.gov or call 800-419-1326) within 48 hours of the kill.

Go to www.in.gov/dnr/fishwild/6271.htm for a searchable list of available check stations in each county.

If the turkey is taken to a check station, a permanent seal will be given and must be fixed to the leg of the turkey. If the turkey is registered online through the CheckIN Game system, a confirmation number will be generated and must be recorded on the temporary transportation tag.

For an online printable version of a temporary transportation tag, see www.wildlife.in.gov/files/turkeytag.pdf

Hunter Orange

Archery hunters must meet fluorescent (hunter) orange requirements while hunting turkeys Dec. 6-21, 2014 and from Dec. 26, 2014 through Jan. 4, 2015.

Fair Chase

While hunting wild turkey, it is illegal to use or possess: a dog; another domesticated animal; a live decoy; a recorded call; an electronically powered or controlled decoy; or bait. An area is considered baited for 10 days after the removal of the bait, but an area is not considered to be baited that is attractive to wild turkeys resulting from normal agricultural practices.

0 Comments »

Why it Matters: Rangefinders

Because of the technology today we are getting further and further away from our basic beginnings. Once upon a time your day looked like this: get up, find food, get to shelter and go to bed. Then some centuries later it got a little more advanced and you added farming into the mix. Then going to work got added onto it, but other aspects of life had become easier. And as we advanced, so did our technology which went in hand with making living easier but not simpler. The stresses people put on “keeping up to date” has caused some serious physiological issues. And as a society we have gotten farther from our awesome outdoors. And going along with that is the loss of certain skills.

Skills like gardening, fishing, tracking, making fires and others are vanishing completely from people’s ability. A huge thing we have lost track of is distance. Years ago to get the distance to somewhere you would have to bust out a map, nowadays it takes mere seconds on a smart-phone. Global communication has also shrunk our world with international calling being a daily occurrence for some people.

I have also noticed that judging simple distances is getting harder for people. This can be a huge problem, especially when it comes to hunting. Being able to judge and know distances is extremely important because it concerns so many aspects of hunting.

How far away is that next ridge? How many miles will it be back to campsite? When will the sun be setting past those mountains? Where exactly is that deer in relation to me? Will my arrow/bullet be able to reach it? What will happen if my bullet passes through and keeps going? All of these could possibly be a life-changing judgment call.

Luckily GPS has our back when it comes to several of those questions. There is no doubt that this has saved numerous lives. But what happens if the batteries die? Well if you kept track of your direction and landmarks you might just be able to make it back safely and before dark. But what about the second half of questions? Knowing the distance to your trophy/meal is extremely important. If you are out on a big-game hunt you should have taken the time to practice with your weapon. Whether it is bow or firearm you should know the limitations of the tool, the projectile and yourself well. The easiest way to know the distance: a rangefinder.

Many consider this just another gadget to have in the field, but it can be a complete game changer. Let’s say you overestimated your shot and the bullet goes over and carries on for a distance longer. Depending on the caliber and the load that distance can be quite longer. But if you know that the animal is close to 100 yards away you know where to hold to get a good, clean ethical shot.

And that is another reason why a rangefinder matters. The worst thing possible is to have a bad shot. Every hunter knows that the best way to honor the animal you are about to harvest is to take it as humanely as possible. You do not want the animal to suffer, and knowing the distance and therefore how to place your projectile is a must. Archers know this extremely well as distance and angle play a huge part in making a shot. Luckily many rangefinders have built in compensators for when shooting on an angle. Also being able to see just how far away that farmhouse and any possible inhabitants can save you from jail time.

When I went on my first big-game hunt a couple years ago I did not have a rangefinder. Luckily my uncle had an extra one for me to borrow. This made a huge difference. Thanks to it, I was able to humanely harvest an animal. Watching a deer drop right where it stood was one of the greatest visuals of my life. Not only knowing that I wasn’t going to have to track it down but that the animal was not put through pain was something to take pride in. I hope the rest of my hunting trips go like this. I know they probably won’t but you can bet that I will be getting a rangefinder before I go out again.

It may add to the cost of your trip and gear but they are well worth it. Over the past years, rangefinders have become increasingly more accurate, dependable, efficient and cost-friendly. Make sure to check into company-backed warranties on them before purchasing. Many big-name optics companies have some kind of warranty or guarantee on their products.

Giddy-Up!!

Previously:

Getting Outdoors

Picking Up

Hunting

Fishing

Hiking

Camping

0 Comments »

My Quest: Can the AR platform effectively take a Whitetail?

Hunting is a passion I was raised on by my father. He started me as a very young boy and, as I got older, my passion for hunting the great American whitetail grew and grew.  I have hunted them from the southeast all the way up into to the midwest. As with hunting, so too did my love of firearms and even more recently, my love for the much debated AR platform rifles.  I have read many internet postings going back and forth about whether an AR could effectively take down a whitetail deer or not.  The more I research I did, the more it sparked my interest.  After much debating inside my head, I decided I wanted to give it a shot. I looked at many different AR platforms before purchasing a CMMG AR chambered in 300 Blackout from my local Bass Pro Shops. While there, I also bought one of the Redfield scopes, scope mount and a box of Hornady 110 V-Max ammo.  Once everything was all sighted in and ready to go, it was time for the hunt.

It was an unusually cold morning in Northern Alabama as we set out to Freedom Hills Management Area located in Cherokee, Alabama.  I remember reading the temperature gauge in the truck, a whopping 6 degrees.  I zipped up my Redhead jacket and headed out on my quest.  The morning was cold and quiet as the sun started to come up and nature started to come to life.  It was still early morning as I watched the squirrels chase each other through the trees.  "This is the life," I sat there, thinking to myself.  Right then I caught a shadow silently moving through the woods to my left.  As I turned to see what it was, I saw this nice mature doe emerge through the trees.  She moved quietly through the woods without the slightest hint that I was even there.  I got ready to take the shot when behind her, I could see another body moving in the brush.  There he was, a very nice six point moving right in behind her.  I waited for him to step out, put the cross arrows on and squeezed the trigger.  As I regained my composure, the deer jumped right back into the thick brush followed by a loud crash of leaves.  Had the much debated AR done it's job?  I gave it a little time and walked over to see what the results were.

There he was, not 45 yards from where I had first seen him.  In the end, I had answered my question:  Yes the AR platform can effectively take a whitetail.

I look forward to my next hunt as I have now chambered another AR in the mighty 450 Bushmaster.

 

Justin K., Apparel Associate

Bass Pro Shops, Nashville

 

0 Comments »

A Fine Nine: Ruger SR9

We have taken a look at some pretty awesome handguns so far with our Fine Nine blog series. All of which have come from big-name companies (like Glock, Berretta, etc.). This month’s handgun comes from another popular gun manufacturer that has built its own following of customers for decades, Ruger.

Now technically the full name of the company is Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. but it is called Ruger for short. They were founded in 1949 and went public twenty years later. The handgun we will be discussing is the SR9. It comes in a couple different models and has been doing quite well with consumers.

Previously Ruger’s line of semi-auto handguns was their P Series. The P series started in 1985 and was produced up until a couple years ago. My first handgun, and gun for that matter, was a Ruger P345 that I love. A few things sold me on this firearm, but there were two important markings on the firearm that did it for me. It said 45ACP and Prescott, AZ on it. I quite enjoy this caliber and loved seeing my home-state as where the firearm came from.

That is a big reason why Ruger has such a strong following, as they are made here in the United States. They are based out of Connecticut, but have other locations that support local economies. Don’t get me wrong, there are some amazing firearms coming out the international market but it is nice owning something from the U.S.

The SR9 was introduced in 2007. It was intended for the conceal-carry market of the firearm industry. The firearm is slim, lightweight, has a higher capacity magazine and several other desirable features to it. The ambidextrous safeties and magazine releases are a nice touch along with the Picatinny rail. It also has a loaded-chamber indicator for quick reference if there is a round in the chamber.

A couple years after the introduction of the SR9 came the SR9C (the compact version of the firearm). It is smaller than the full-size and holds fewer rounds as such. The standard SR9 magazine holds 17 rounds whereas the SR9C holds 10 rounds. Ruger went ahead though and produced a magazine with grip extender for the SR9C giving it the ability to quickly convert to a higher-capacity magazine grip.

This is a huge selling point for consumers. This way you can carry the firearm with the smaller and easier to conceal magazine but be able to throw in the larger one in a quick-reload. It hasn’t been just consumers noticing the SR9C but in fact it was chosen as the Shooting Industry Academy of Excellence's Handgun of the Year in 2010! Straight-shootin’ there, Ruger!

-Giddy-Up!!

Previous Nines:

Basics

Glock 19

S&W M&P

Beretta 92

FNX-9

Springfield XD

0 Comments »

Look at That! RedHead Gun Rack

There are certain stereotypical items that complete the visual when it comes to rustic living. There is the pair of rocking chairs on the front porch. A bird feeder full of visitors. Either a “Welcome to the Lake House” or lodge themed wooden sign. A stack of fishing poles by the back door. A gun rack on the wall. All of these items can make one forget about the worries of today’s modern world and take a step back to something much simpler.

And would ya look at that?! Thanks to RedHead 1856 4-Gun Rack, now you can own a piece of it!

Now please note that while a gun rack is a method of storing firearms, they should never be kept loaded and better protection/prevention should be used if children/strangers are present.

This tasteful take on an old favorite is a modern-day crowd pleaser. It is constructed out of pine and has a nice brown-cherry finish to it. It can hold four long-guns and has a bonus feature on the bottom. There is a storage area that can be used for ammunition, cleaning supplies, eye and ear protection or whatever. The storage area also locks, which is a nice touch.

Now gun racks are designed to keep firearms where they are easier to access. Many people from more rural parts of the country have them as you never know when dinner might go by or if you need to give a 12-gauge reminder to the local bear population to stay away. That is just the way life is. With how removed people are from nature nowadays it is understandable why some people couldn’t understand the need for this.

Gun safes are very nice. Not only can you safely store firearms and ammunition, but also important papers and other goods. But they are heavy and take up what could be precious room. If you are going to stay at a cabin with a group of trusted friends for a weeklong hunt, a safe could be a little much whereas the gun rack would be just right.

-Giddy-Up!!

Other Nifty Things to Look At!

Propane Fire Ring

Hand Towels

Rainproof Camo

She Outdoor

PETT

BPS Extreme Qualifier Tackle Bag

0 Comments »

Check it Out List: Tactical Clothing

Two words that have infiltrated the shooting world over the past years, tactical and zombie. From those two words, different worlds have been developed. And combining those words is a whole different ball game!

When it comes to the term tactical, there is a whole slew of things it can involve. Tactical shooting, clothing, maneuvering, reloading, pens, holsters, water bottles, knives, flashlights and so on. So much so that many simply mock the whole “tactical” concept.

But like many things that can come under ridicule, tactical apparel does have sound reasoning behind it. So for this month’s Check it Out List we are going to go over Tactical Clothing.

 

Tactical Shirt

Tactical Pants/Shorts

Tactical Belt

Tactical Gloves

Tactical Jacket

Tactical Boots

 

Most often tactical products are concerning self-defense. It goes hand in hand with possible combat and carrying a firearm. You really wouldn’t want to be caught in a gun-fight with pajama pants, flip flops and a lose shirt. You are going to want clothing that is secure, leaving little room for possible issues occurring while drawing and firing a firearm.

Working our way down the list, let us start with the shirt. There is an assortment of shirts: long sleeve, short sleeve, button up, polo and so on. Each different style will provide you with some kind of advantage. Also depending on the weather and possibly your job or plan for the day will help you choose what to wear.

The pants and shorts are well known for having numerous pockets on them. This is for your extra magazines, knife, flashlight, standard everyday items (phone, wallet, etc.) and more. Unlike cargo shorts, these pockets do not bulge out so you are less likely to get caught on something while moving. Also the pockets hold items more securely so you are not fishing around to find the desired item.

The belt may be the simplest yet most important aspect. First thing to notice is how thick it is. The thickness and height of the belt help keep a holster on your person. Try wearing a holster on a normal belt and notice how much wiggle there is. Now when you have to draw your firearm that wiggle space could throw you off and be a huge difference to the outcome. A tactical belt will almost eliminate that “wiggle room” completely.

Two items are more for personal preference. Gloves are great to shoot with, but not always necessary. And you probably won’t go around wearing them all day anyway so it would look a little unnatural. They do allow one to grip a firearm better and can help if dealing with a “hot” firearm. Gloves do not sweat like your hand might in a stressful situation so it helps keep something important from “slipping out”.

A nice tactical jacket will allow you to have numerous pockets (much like the pants/shorts) and may even have special pockets to carry extra magazines or the firearm itself. These jackets tend to be built well so they do a nice job of keeping you warm and providing you with ease of access for items.

You can tell a lot about someone by their shoes. Tactical boots are very nice and many who wear them tend to wear nothing else. These boots are built light, solid and comfortable. Thinking about having to be in a self-defense situation you are not going to want to worry about tripping on your shoelaces or even worse being in flip flops. There has been an increasing trend for use of tactical boots for hunting and hiking because of how well they work.

No matter what your goal is, hopefully this has opened your eyes or opinions to other options.

-Giddy-Up!!

Checked-Lists

Picnics

Gun Cleaning

Game Care

First Aid

Kayaking

Day Pack

Trip Prep

Range Time

Fishing Pack

Boating Day Trip

Camp Cooking

 Dove Hunting

Upland Hunting

0 Comments »

A Fine Nine: Springfield XD

Let me go ahead and say that I have never been a big fan of Springfield XDs. Just something about them never really got my gears going. But a while back they introduced a firearm that I was immediately interested in, their XDS model in 45ACP. I tested the firearm out and was impressed. Then when I was really searching for an EDC (every day carry) pistol in 45ACP, I tested out a number of others. I tried the M&P compact, Glock 30, Glock 36 and a couple small 1911s. With nothing really standing out, I tried the XDS again and was truly impressed and acquired one. I have yet to have an issue with mine and am now a proud supporter of the Springfield XDs.

Now I have said this before as many others will, gun manufacturers and personal preference are like trucks. You have Chevy people, Ford people and Dodge people. Same with firearms, you have Colt people, Glock guys and Ruger fans and so on. People either love the Springfield XDs or don’t. But having been out since 2001, they have created quite the following.

So XD stands for “Extreme Duty” as these are what they were designed for. There are actually three different series of the XD models. The models are XD, XDM and XDS and they can come in a slew of variants beyond just that. Most models will have full-size, compact or subcompact variants. That is except for the XDS which comes in either a 3.3” barrel or a 4” barrel. This model is the specific concealed carry line of XDs but is still loaded with great features (ambi-safety, loaded-chamber indicator, etc.) like its “bigger brothers”.

The XD line has a 3” barrel option and several different ones for 4” and 5” barrels. Like their site says “In 2001, Springfield Armory® redefined what a polymer pistol should be. The XD® series set the new industry standard for ergonomic comfort, ease of operation, features and performance.”

Six years after the introduction of the XD, Springfield gave us the XDM line. The M stands for match as it is a heavier-duty firearm than its predecessor. Just like with the XD line, there are several barrel lengths available, including a 5.25” competition model. And speaking of competitions, more and more Springfields are showing up at shooting events. Last year we had a couple professional shooters that were on the Springfield Team, and they swore by their handguns (and not just because of the sponsorship).

As I said about the XDS having features similar to the other models, lets go over some of those. Springfield is proud to state that “The features available on the XD(M)® will impress even the most demanding shooters. The XD(M)® includes a basic list of safety features shared with its predecessor the XD®. The striker status indicator and loaded chamber indicator give the shooter instant tactile and visual feedback to know if there is a chambered round and if the striker is cocked. Three separate safeties guard against accidental discharges and provide extra peace of mind. The Ultra Safety Assurance (USA) Action Trigger System™ prevents unintentional rearward movement of the trigger. The grip safety keeps the pistol from firing unless the shooter has a firm grasp on it. And an internal firing pin block goes the extra mile to bring you a pistol fully designed with safety in mind.”

What I really like is that their safety features are effective enough to work but not so cumbersome to be a nuisance if having to draw the firearm and fire in a self-defense situation. If there is an external safety that needs to be moved into a position to allow the firearm to shoot, one could easily forget to flip it in a stressful situation. The fact that the external safeties in the XDs are one on the rear grip and the trigger itself means that they help prevent accidents they won’t get in the way of a self-defense scenario. Your hand will naturally grab the rear grip to press in the safety there and your finer will control the trigger safety as well. (I would know, I own one.)

Now this blog is supposed to be about 9MM handguns, and just about every variation of any Springfield XD model comes in 9MM. Whether it is an XD-4” or XDM-3.8”, they tend to come in this quite popular caliber. Several years ago one would tell you that you should skip a 9MM and go to a larger caliber. With all the developments in defense ammunition over the past couple years; this caliber has increased its stopping power. It should not be considered “weak” by any means anymore. The improvements to both ammunition and the firearms have increased their effectiveness and quality all over.

Shortly after releasing the XDS in 45ACP came a version chambered in 9MM. To be honest, as will many other XDS45ACP owners admit, I wish I had picked up the 9MM version. Not only do you get a couple more rounds, but it is easier to control.

So just like any other purchase one might look to, do your research and ask around. People are always happy to give their opinions on anything from trucks to toasters and so on, and of course firearms. Just be sure to think about a Springfield XD model when looking for any kind of 9MM handgun.

-Giddy-Up!!

Previous Nines:

Basics

Glock 19

S&W M&P

Beretta 92

FNX-9

0 Comments »

A Simple Guide to safe firearms class

Straight Shooters - So a few weeks ago I received an invite from Mike Duffy to try out an SGI - Defensive Pistol Craft I course. Mike is the founder and Chief Operations Officer of Solutions Group International (SGI).

Here's an excerpt taken from their website to help give an idea of who they are..."Solutions Group International (SGI) was created to provide Specialized Security Services, Law Enforcement & Military Tactical Training, Threat Matrix & Vulnerability Assessments, Leading-edge Anti-Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism Applications, and Investigations to the Law Enforcement, Military, Entertainment & Film Industry, Security, Government, and Corporate Sectors worldwide."

Their website also gives you a list of their instructors and their qualifications. Reading through their bios, it's quick to see that they are simply the best-of-the-best. I was personally sold knowing that they primarily train Military and Law Enforcement agencies. The eight hour course was held at Prado Shooting Park in Chino on a private portion of the range known as Condor 2. The day started with introductions from the three man training team and an overview of what we were in store for. The instructor cadre consisted of George Holt (SGI President), Grant Reynolds, and Marty Higuera. Being an introductory class into Defensive Pistol shooting, we started with the basics. Even after all the shooting I've done, there's still something to learn and get refreshed on after all my time on the range. We started by reviewing the 4 rules of firearms safety, core marksmanship skills and techniques, proper reloading, stance, and a few other topics to ensure even a true beginner was up to speed with the basic knowledge needed for the day.

Now you may be thinking that you are an above average pistol shooter and this introductory class is below you; well think again. The SGI crew did a great job of tailoring their instruction to each student as the day progressed. They moved down the line during live fire drills giving each student tips based on their individual needs and skills. At no point did I feel like I was being held back by the other students who may have had a slower learning curve. I was being pushed to draw quicker and shoot faster. Grant said something like, "Push yourself to the breaking point where you fail to produce the results you're looking for." He's basically saying that if you only do what you're comfortable with, you will never get any better. Because of this, we constantly tried to shoot quicker and faster.

The live-fire portion of the day had many different drills incorporated into it. This included shooting from 3 yards from the hip when you don't have time for proper sight alignment, drawing and placing two center mass, failure to stop drills consisting of two center mass and one to the head, target transition drills, shooting from farther distances, shooting on the move and proper foot placement while moving, and multiple engagement drills. There was always something to keep you on your toes. The intensity the instructors brought kept a high level of motivation to the line and a feeling of not wanting to let them down. I had a great time and am looking forward to their next class in the series of the 6 Defensive Crafts courses they offer.

Mike and his crew run a top-of-the-line company and offer some amazing courses. I will definitely be coming back for a future pistol course and probably take some of their others as well. I encourage you to pull up their website and take a look at their list of courses and instructors.

http://www.solutionsgroupinternational.com/

The $225 course includes 300 rounds of ammo and a $25 Bass Pro Shops gift card. This is a really good price for the 8-hour course that includes 300 rounds of whatever ammo you want to shoot.

 

 

0 Comments »

BOSL and Other Gun Deer Season Reminders

Rod Slings, is Founder/CEO of Hunting and Shooting Related Consultants LLC and retired Iowa Department of Natural Resources Law Enforcement Supervisor. As a hunting incident investigator, interviewing the victims, their families and evaluating the scenes, he has seen firsthand the sometimes tragic results of carelessness in the field. So, as we get ready to open Iowa Gun Deer Season, take a moment to review his reminders before heading out and lessen the chance of injury to yourself, others, and wildlife.

____________________

The annual trek to the Iowa woods is about to begin. Yes, it’s gun deer season!  This is a time when family and friends, year after year, gather to help manage Iowa’s deer population and fill their freezers.  Due to a greater number of tags being issued the last few year's hunters, may find the population down somewhat. In fact the January antlerless season has been eliminated and antlerless tags reduced. (Please check the Iowa DNR website for all the details.)

No matter what, don’t let emotion or peer pressure cause you to enter the zone of, “I must harvest a deer,” to have a good hunt.  Remember, hunting is NOT a competition!  You need to plan your hunt and hunt your plan. What that means is whether you're hunting alone or in a large group, you need to have a plan and stick to it. Safety is number one! 

Did you know shooting at running deer is the number one risk of causing a firearm-related incident?

Here are a few additional things to think about before opening day:

  • When hunting deer from a blind during the regular shotgun deer season, the blind must exhibit a solid blaze orange marking with a minimum of 144 square inches visible in all directions. A blind is defined as a place of concealment constructed, either wholly or partially, from man made materials, which is used for the purpose of hiding a person who is hunting from sight. A blind is not a naturally occurring landscape feature or an arrangement of natural or agricultural plant material that a hunter uses for concealment. In addition to the requirements above, hunters using blinds must also satisfy the requirements of wearing blaze orange.
     
  • If you're going to hunt from a treestand, always wear your Fall Arrest System to make sure you remain secured from the time you leave the ground to your safe descent. There are a number of different types of safety harnesses available that will save you from severe injury or even death. It’s important to stay connected! Always use a haul line to pull up and lower your unloaded firearm. Falling from a treestand is the number one way hunters are injured. So many times we have heard, “I didn’t think it would ever happen to me!”  Don’t let this happen to you! 
  • Hunting on private land requires permission. Know where the property boundaries and buildings are, and where livestock may be located.
  • Report any observed violations to a conservation officer or local sheriff as soon as possible. The Iowa DNR Turn In Poachers (TIP) telephone number is 1-800-532-2020. Program it into your cell phone for access to an officer; help protect Iowa’s Wildlife.
  • Always respect both public and private property, the non-hunting public and wildlife. Be sensitive to everyone when displaying harvested game. You represent all of us when you’re a hunter! 

Remember:

  • Follow all firearms safety rules.
  • Be sure of your target and what’s beyond.
  • Blaze Orange Saves Lives!
  • If you hunt from a treestand, make sure you wear a fall arrest system.
  • Know and obey all hunting regulations; they are there to protect you, others and wildlife.

Hunt SAFE and have a GREAT Iowa Hunting Season!

______________________

Like us @  Bass Pro Shops Altoona
Visit us @ www.basspro.com/altoona
Tweet us @bassproaltoona
Pin us @ pinterest.com/bpsaltoona
View us @ 
youtube.com/bassproshopsaltoona
Picture us @ instagram.com/bassproshops_altoona

 

 

0 Comments »