Simple Steps with Wes: Snake Bites

So back in June I wrote a blog about rattlesnakes! As per my forte, the article was more about education and entertainment. But what would you do, if you really encountered one? And not just a rattlesnake, but any of the venomous snakes we have in North America? Well lucky for us, Wes is covering that specific subject for this month’s Simple Step blog:

“North America has two kinds of venomous snakes:  The pit vipers (rattlesnakes, water moccasins) and Elapids (coral snakes).  One or more of these snakes can be found almost everywhere in the continental U.S

Many snakes are active at night, especially in warm weather. In the wilderness, it’s important to look where you’re putting your hands and feet.  Be especially careful around areas where snakes might like to hide, such as hollow logs, under rocks, or in old shelters. Wearing heavy gloves would be a reasonable precaution. Be sure to wear good solid high-top boots and long pants when hiking in the wilderness. Walking heavy creates ground vibrations and noise, which will often cause snakes move along.

Not every bite from a venomous snake transfers its poison to the victim; 25-30% of these bites will show no ill effects. Snake bites that cause a burning pain immediately are likely to have venom in them.  Swelling at the site may begin as soon as five minutes afterwards, and may travel up the affected area.  Pit viper bites tend to cause bruising and blisters at the site of the wound.  Numbness may be noted in the area bitten, or perhaps on the lips or face.  Some victims describe a metallic or other strange taste in their mouths.

 With pit vipers, bruising is not uncommon and a serious bite might start to cause spontaneous bleeding from the nose or gums.  Coral snake bites, however, will cause mental and nerve issues such as twitching, confusion and slurred speech.  Later, nerve damage may cause difficulty with swallowing and breathing, followed by total paralysis.

Coral snakes appear very similar to their look-alike, the non-venomous king snake.  They both have red, yellow and black bands and are commonly confused with each other.  The old saying goes: ”red touches yellow, kill a fellow; red touches black, venom it lacks”.  This adage only applies to coral snakes in North America, however.

Coral snakes are not as aggressive as pit vipers and will prefer fleeing to attacking.  Once they bite you, however, they tend to hold on; Pit vipers prefer to bite and let go quickly. Unlike coral snakes, pit vipers may not relinquish their territory to you, so prepare to possibly be bitten again.

A snake doesn’t always slither away after it bites you and it’s likely has more venom that it can inject. If bitten move out of its striking range, which can be twice its body length or mitigate the hazard in any way you can. Killing the snake, however, may not render it harmless: it can reflexively bite for a period of time, even if its head has been severed from its body. Removing the head and bury it 10-12” deep.

The treatment for a venomous snake bite is “Anti-venom”, an animal or human serum with antibodies capable of neutralizing a specific biological toxin. This product will probably be unavailable in a long-term survival situation.

The following wilderness treatment strategy will be useful:

 • Keep the victim calm. Stress increases blood flow, thereby endangering the patient by speeding the venom into the system.

 • Stop all movement of the injured extremity. Movement will move the venom into the circulation faster, so do your best to keep the limb still.

 • Clean the wound thoroughly to remove any venom that isn’t deep in the wound

 • Remove rings and bracelets from an affected extremity as swelling may occur.

 • Position the extremity below the level of the heart; this also slows the transport of venom.

 • Wrap with compression bandages snug but do not restrict blood flow. Begin two to four inches above the bite (towards the heart), winding around and moving up, then back down over the bite and past it towards the hand or foot. Do not use tourniquets.

 • Draw a circle, if possible, around the affected area.  As time progresses, you will see improvement or worsening at the site more clearly. This is a useful strategy to follow any local reaction or infection.

The limb should then be rested, and perhaps immobilized with a splint or sling.  The less movement there is, the better. Keep the patient on bed rest, with the bite site lower than the heart for 24-48 hours. This strategy also works for bites from venomous lizards, like Gila monsters.

It is no longer recommended to make an incision and try to suck out the venom with your mouth.  If done more than 3 minutes after the actual bite, it would remove perhaps 1/1000 of the venom and could cause damage or infection to the bitten area.  A Sawyer Extractor (a syringe with a suction cup) is more modern, but is also fairly ineffective in eliminating more than a small amount of the venom. These methods fail, mostly, due to the speed at which the venom is absorbed.“

Thanks, Wes! Remember, you can always request a subject or topic by emailing it to dtkurtz@basspro.com . Get more of Wes at his Facebook and Webpage.

-Giddy-Up!!

Previous Steps

Floods Dehydration Halloween Edition Survival Kit Daylight Estimation

Determining Direction Eye Protection Nature Calling First Aid Kits

Epi-Pens Scorpions Edible Fruit Search and Rescue Clouds Traps Celestial Navigation

Footwear Communication Trick or Treating Fire 12 Steps (Reboot) Military Lessons

0 Comments »

Simple Steps with Wes: Military Lessons

One of our oldest running blog series, and by far one of my favorites, has been Simple Steps with Wes. These started all the way back in 2013. They were the brain-child of one of our amazing associates, Wes. He was a Lead in our store and has extensive survival knowledge. He loves sharing this information and passion with others. Earlier this month, he was back in action at our store and was handling the seminars for our Family Summer Camp.

And that is one of things that I admire about him. He can give seminars to crowds of kids just as easy as talking to a classroom full of adults looking for helpful hints and tricks. Some of that ability to adapt, had to come from his military background. And that is where this month’s Simple Step comes from, his military background. Enjoy!

“I have learned many lessons in the military and in this edition of Simple Steps I hope to convey some specific ones about hiking and backpacking. “Rucking” is the military term for hiking with a full pack or “Rucksack”. As you can imagine, this is a huge issue for the military, as soldiers must wear body armor and carry weapons, ammo, water, communications equipment, and other gear critical to complete the missions. During my last training event I was carry just over 85 lbs. not including my weapon and ammo.

In order to maintain optimal capabilities military service members learn very valuable lessons along the way which can help keep you at your best when you decide to hit the trail.

1. One pound on your feet equals five pounds on your back.

Aside from selecting the proper footwear (which we covered during an earlier edition of simple steps), the weight carried at the shoe takes five time more energy to maintain the same pace of travel  as it would carrying the weight at the torso level. Simply put, lighter footwear equals less strain on the body and is more energy efficiency. In practical terms, this means you could carry half a gallon more of water if you buy boots that are a pound lighter.

2. Managing pack weight needs to be a conscious effort 

Packing what you need, not everything you want, will keep weight out of the pack. Researching potential weather conditions can also help you make decisions in what you leave at home as well. Ideally, a backpack should not weigh more than 30% of the carrier’s body weight. Each 1% of your body weight carried in your pack makes you 6 seconds slower per mile. Small changes such as flashlights that use smaller and less batteries, proper sleeping bag selection, aluminum cookware, and smart food selections can all help subtract pack weight quickly.

3. Comfort starts in how you pack

Packing lighter items lower and heavier items closer to the top of the pack helps keep better posture. As you hike, your upper body naturally leans forward. Weight at the top of the back will work with your body and lessen muscle fatigue in your shoulders and back. Properly adjusting should straps and belt straps will allow the back weight to be supported more evenly, rather than straining just shoulder and back muscles alone.  

4. Downhill is harder on the body than uphill

Going downhill places twice as much strain on your body as going uphill. Why? Braking forces. As you descend, you have to brake your speed with your quads to keep yourself under control. The steeper the downhill, the more braking. This added load on your muscles further affects your uphill performance if you have repeated bouts of up and down work. This also adds to the risk of knee and ankle injuries.

By selecting the proper footwear, bringing only what you need and packing it properly, you can keep the strain of your body and sustain yourself for longer distances and with lower risk of injuries. Read, research and ask questions and you can experience more of life in the great outdoors.

If you have questions or would like to see a topic covered in a future edition of Simple Steps with Wes, submit them to dtkurtz@basspro.com. “

Thanks, Wes! With all the upcoming big-game hunting seasons and just people going out into the woods more this is really good stuff to know. Until next time! Get more of Wes at his Facebook and Webpage.

-Giddy-Up!!

Previous Steps

Floods Dehydration Halloween Edition Survival Kit Daylight Estimation

Determining Direction Eye Protection Nature Calling First Aid Kits

Epi-Pens Scorpions Edible Fruit Search and Rescue Clouds Traps Celestial Navigation

Footwear Communication Trick or Treating Fire 12 Steps (Reboot)

0 Comments »

Hiking Boots

Basic Information about Hiking Boots

 

When planning our outdoor adventures, we must always consider, “What is the proper footwear for my outing”?  Beach sandals and flip flops, Casual and boat shoes or Trekking and hiking boots.  Many people are unaware that hiking boots/shoes actually serve you best when used in the proper hiking adventure.

 

This short blog is simply to provide a brief description of the types of hiking boots and their purpose in our outdoor lives.  Essentially, there are Hiking Shoes, Hiking Boots, Backpacking Boots and Mountaineering Boots.  Hiking shoes are generally low-cut light weight models designed for short walks or trail running.  These are used mostly by ultralight hiking enthusiasts.  Hiking boots typically are mid or high cut, providing more support, and are intended for day hikes and weekend backpacking trips involving light loads of gear.  Backpacking boots are designed for carrying heavy loads of gear, mostly used for multi-day backpacking trips deep into the back country.  These boots are durable and more supportive with stiffer midsoles than the lighter hiking models.  Mountaineering boots are much heavier than the lightweight hiking shoes, are more supportive, tough and durable and have some level insulating materials.

 

Bass Pro Shops carries a full line of Hiking Shoes and Boots to fit just about every outdoor adventure.  Our friendly, customer oriented associates are here to help you match your footwear to your adventure.

Matching our footwear to our outdoor adventure enhances our outdoor experience, and when we have the right shoe/boot in the right environment our feet are more comfortable and protected…and when our feet feel good, we can have a great experience in the Great Outdoors.

 

Michael Lawson

Bass Pro Shops

Grapevine, Texas

0 Comments »

The choices in hiking footwear

Spring is in full swing! That can only mean one thing, lots and lots of RAIN. Don’t let rain put a damper on your outdoor activities and invest in a pair a waterproof hiking boots. Hiking shoes are a wonderful shoe option, especially this time of year, because of their versatility. They come on many different brands and styles with features to fit any ones needs.

 

..

Deciding what you need out of your shoe and what features are necessary is the first step to picking the right hiker for you. The first decision you will want to make is between a Mid and low top. Mids reach just above the ankle and will offer ankle support for those who need it. They are great for the aggressive hiker or anyone that likes to have that added support. Low tops are a tennis shoe height  and while offering great foot-bed support do not offer ankle support. One more big decision you need to make is whether you need/want waterproof or not. Waterproof is an awesome feature but not necessary for everyone. We have a variety of styles that are full leather with waterproof as well as several that still offer breathability. After those 2 decisions everything else will fall into place.

Now to highlight some of our top styles this season; RedHead offers many great styles of hikers that will give you more bang for your buck. The first I will talk about is the RedHead Ranger Ridge; this particular shoe comes in a mid as well as low top version. Both are waterproof and rated highly for comfort, support, and durability. It is also available in woman’s styles. Another great style in RedHead is the Trekker Low Trail Shoe. This shoe is great for everyday use and light hiking. It is a lightweight breathable shoe that still offers the waterproof feature.

Now for our top selling brand, Merrell is the best of the best as far as hikers are concerned. They are durable and rated the highest across the board in comfort. We carry SEVERAL styles that are sure to please but I will just highlight a few. The first is the Moab Mid Waterproof. This shoe sports a 100% waterproof membrane while still being extremely breathable. It is light weight with an aggressive Vibram rubber outsole that offers shock absorbency and last ability. Just try it on and it sells itself!  We also carry this same style with all the same features in a low top, and they both come in womans styles!!

As you can see we have many great hiking options to fit anyone’s needs, and to think these are just few. Come in to your local Bass Pro Shops to see our full selection and to receive expert help in deciding the best shoe for you!

 

Check out this other greatly written blog! - Hiking Shoes vs. Hiking Boots

Chelsea McDaniel

Team Lead of footwear

0 Comments »

Washington State Parks Free Days

In honor of National Trails Day on Saturday, June 6 and National Get Outdoors Day on Saturday, June 13  Washington State Parks are open for free use to the following activities:

  • hiking
  • biking
  • backpacking
  • picnicking

 

Typically, day use of state parks is $10 per day when a vehicle is brought onto state park grounds, or a yearly Discover Pass is required (cost is $30) to access the parks by vehicle. With the upcoming free days all day-use fees are waived.

The camping department at Bass Pro Shops Tacoma has plenty of gear to ensure your time spent outside during the state park free days are comfortable, enjoyable, safe and most of all fun! Just a few items you may want to include in your backpacks are:

  • Sunscreen
  • Bug repellent
  • Water
  • Granola bars or trail mix
  • First Aid kit

Other items you may want to wear or bring with you are sunglasses, a hat, trekking poles for gaining traction in rugged or slippery terrain or if you plan on hiking great distances, a hydration pack. Additionally, plan for variable weather conditions, since the climate in the Pacific Northwest can be tricky and changes frequently. Be sure to utilize base layer clothing and/or bring along a light, packable jacket with a hood. Also, wear a pair of hiking socks that wick away moisture and good-fitting hiking boots.

Have questions about hiking or backpacking gear? Feel free to ask our experts! Call or stop by your Tacoma Bass Pro Shops, 253-671-5700.

~Amanda Bretz

 

0 Comments »

How to Choose the Correct Insole!

 

When hiking, backpacking or running your feet hurt, you get blisters or hotspots that

might mean it is time for new insoles.

Types of Insole

 

Comfort Insoles

 

These can be flat or shaped and can be made of gel or foam.

There are different size choices for insoles. Full length, 3/4 length or

arch or heel inserts.

 

Support Insoles

 

These are made of a harder material for structural support and stability.

Comfort is from the stability rather than the cushioning.

They are not customized to an individual foot, support insoles come in

different styles to suit most foot shapes.

 

Tips for Fitting Insoles

 

First stand on the insole outside of the shoe.

Check to see how stable you feel, and how much

pressure you feel.

Then try it in your shoe. Always remember to remove the insole that

comes with your shoe. Be sure to check stability of the shoe with new

insole make sure it takes up the right amount of space: not to much

or to little. Your shoe should feel comfortable not to loose or to tight.

 

Insole Care Tips

 

Most insoles will last up to 12 months if used daily or on a regular basis.

They may last a few years in footwear that is used on an occasional or seasonal

basis.

 

Air them out:  Remove your insoles regularly to dry out moisture

trapped between insole and foot bed.

 

Wash them:  Use a mild detergent and air dry.

 

Inspect them:  Periodically remove and inspect for signs of deterioration.

http://www.basspro.com/Shoe-%26-Boot-Accessories/_/S-12500005000

Check out some of Bass Pro Shops Shoe & Boot Accessories in the link above!

0 Comments »

Backpacking for Beginners!

If you’re a first time backpacker you need to make the decision of who you would like to team up with, if anyone at all. Partner up with an experienced backpacker or a  group (4-6 people typically) Someone with knowledge is good for peace of mind and also makes it more fun than going it alone.

You should have a backpacking checklist which should include  “The Ten Essentials”. Make sure that whatever gear you take you and your partner know what it is for and how it is all used.

Pick an appropriate destination, something that won’t be too long for your first time and the terrain is something you’ll be able to handle.

For beginners a one night trip to start makes more sense than being out longer and not being too sure or confident.

Start by making a list. Here are just a few things that are essential to make your first backpacking trip a success.

 

  1. Map or Compass
  2. Sunglasses or Sunscreen
  3. Emergency Shelter
  4. Extra Water
  5. Extra Food
  6. Extra Clothing
  7. Flashlight and or Headlamp
  8. First Aid Kit
  9. Repair Kit/Tools/Knife  (and last but not least)
  10. Waterproof matches/lighter/candles

Now the fun starts by picking out a backpack, tent, sleeping bag or pad, clothing, hiking boots or shoes, food,  a satellite phone or two way radio,

Insect repellant  and bear spray. A trip itinerary left with a friend or  even under your car seat would be wise, in the case of an emergency.

These are just a few things to get you started. Make sure you do your homework by picking the right area, the right equipment and essentials.

The most important step above everything else is to be Safe and have a GREAT time…

Shop our extensive Camping selection at basspro.com!

0 Comments »

Hiking Boot Buyer's Guide

When To Replace Your Shoes

 

A pair of standard running shoes will last about 6 months. However, there are many factors that

influence how often to replace your shoes. If you use running shoes for everyday use they will not

last as long. Running in old or worn out shoes can lead to running injuries. When you run in worn-out shoes it increases the stress and impact on your legs and joints.

  

 

How to tell when to replace your running shoes

 

The general rule, most running shoes will last 300-400 miles depending on your height, weight and terrain you run on.  If you run on the trails you'll need to replace them sooner than running on a treadmill. If you take care of

your running shoes you will get alot more miles out of them.

The feel of the shoe will tell you before any other way. If your feet start to hurt or your knees ache it is time to replace your shoes. The soles last longer than the cushioning of the shoes. If the soles are worn down it is

definitely time to replace your shoes.

  

 

 

Making Your Shoes Last Longer

 

Removing your shoes properly will extend the life of your shoe. For example by unlacing them and using

your hand to remove them instead of kicking them of with the other foot they'll last longer.

Rotating your shoes will also extend the life of your shoe.

 

Check out what Bass Pro Shops holds http://www.basspro.com/Shoes-Boots-Boots/Classification-Mens/_/N-1z0usudZ1z0v21r we have a great selection on boots, crocs , sandals and even casual shoes for men and women!

http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Navigation?storeId=10151&catalogId=10051&langId=-1&searchTerm=womens+shoes

0 Comments »

Wading Through Waders

What do you use waders for?  Do you use them to hunt?  Outdoor work?  Fishing?  Whatever your reason to use waders, let the associates at Bass Pro Shop help you find the right wader for the right reason with the right budget.

Finding the right wader is important, not only can it ruin your mood, but it may ruin your entire day if you get wet.

There are three styles of waders to consider, hip, waist, and chest.  Common materials used for waders are rubber, neoprene, waterproof, breathable fabrics, and nylon.

Hip waders are very comfortable in warmer waters.  Very easy on and off they are great for small streams, they pack easy. The Redhead Bone Dry Hobbs Creek Hip Waders have a lug sole and are tough, comfortable, and affordable.

 

 

 

 

http://www.basspro.com/RedHead-BoneDry-Hobbs-Creek-Hip-Waders-Lug-Sole/product/31398/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Waist high waders wear just like a pair of pants.  Belt loops and a belt to hold them up.  Your upper body is exposed so again very comfortable for the warm weather.

 

Chest waders are all around waders that provide the most coverage.  Water can be unpredictable so when trying these on make sure you are covered allowing a few extra inches higher than you need.  The Redhead Classic Series II Brown Neoprene Boot Foot Waders are flexible with 200 grams for warmth and come in men, ladies, or youth sizes.  Need a plus size?  Check out the Redhead Bone Dry Big Man Neoprene Boot Foot Wader with 600 grams, fits up to a shoe size 15.  Chest goes to 58.5", waist 61" and a inseam of up to 41.5".

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.basspro.com/RedHead-Classic-Series-II-Brown-Neoprene-BootFoot-Waders-for-Men-Ladies-or-Youth/product/10209217/http://www.basspro.com/RedHead-BoneDry-BigMan-Neoprene-BootFoot-Waders/product/41033/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What materials do you want?  Breathable uninsulated waders are lightweight and comfortable.  The fabric locks out moisture while allowing perspiration to vent at the same time.  The knees and seat are reinforced. Neoprene waders are tough and hard to beat in the cold weather.  Comfortable and durable but not breathable.  The material reminds you of a wetsuit.  Nylon waders are durable and inexpensive.  Rubber is tough durable and heavy.  It all depends what work or fun you will be having with these.  Simms Freestone Stocking Foot Waders are breathable, waterproof and convert to waist high waders easy.  Add the Simms Freestone Wading Boot with leather upper which are comfortable, durable and are able to lace up for stability.

 

 

 

http://www.basspro.com/Simms-Freestone-StockingFoot-Waders-for-Men/product/1408280346404/

http://www.basspro.com/Simms-Freestone-Wading-Boots-for-Men-Lead/product/1408280346416/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you need a extreme wader?  Look no farther than the Redhead Bone Dry Extreme Waders, with 1000 grams of pure warmth.  One piece construction makes this durable, comfortable and ready for whatever extreme you give it.

 

 

http://www.basspro.com/RedHead-BoneDry-Extreme-Waders-for-Men/product/41036/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Footwear, do you want a Boot foot wader that is all one construction?  Quick on and off they have a rubber or felt sole.  The only negative is you cannot lace them up for stable footing.  The Stockingfoot waders need a boot for better stablility and some even come with a option of what sole you may want.  Felt soles are great when the rocks are slippery, while a hiking sole is better if you need to walk a distance to your fishing spot.  Metal studded felt is considered the best traction for slippery bottoms.

Which ever wader you choose, taking care of them is a must.  Hang them to dry.  If storing them, make sure the boot is completely dry and then store them in a cool, dark place with no sun.  Something that might help you dry is the Peet Wader Dryer  .  This book dryer has a gentle thermal convection that dries sweat and moisture quickly.  It also neutralizes odors brought on by perspiration.

 

 

 

http://www.basspro.com/PEET-Wader-Dryer/product/10225598/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stop on by and check out the large variety of waders we have.  We will have one to fit your need, and budget.

 

Robin Piedmonte - Events Coordinator

 

0 Comments »

Simple Steps with Wes: 12 Steps Reboot

Undoubtedly, the Simple Steps blogs have been one of the longest running articles we produce. We have gone over numerous subjects since we first started these years ago. It is truly awesome that Wes keeps helping us with these, and providing us with extremely useful information. Last year, we started off with a 12-Step program that was loaded with skills to learn. Wes hoped it gave a guideline and some direction for those of us seeking more knowledge. And like any other “New Year’s Resolution” kind of deal, I am sure many put it on the back burner after a while.

That is why we are going to bring it back to start this year’s round of Simple Steps. You’ll notice that some of the subjects, we have already covered and some new ones still remain. We hope it gets you back into the mindset to make this year one of your most resilient! Enjoy!

A Survival Twelve Step Program

Some people may look at me and say to themselves “Man that guy as got a problem, he should get some help”.  Well the first step to step to recovery from any problem is admitting you have one.  Well the last place to have a problem is out in the wilderness and off the beaten path so I’m here to help and the best time to turn over a new leaf is at the New Year.  To get your year started out right make a promise to yourself to learn a new skill every month this year that will help make you a better, more efficient, and a self reliant survivalist.

 Here is a list of suggestions that might get the wheels turning.  Some may take a little more time than others and some may be skills you already have.  There is no order they should be done so plan around your own lifestyle and replace proficient skills on the list with ones you want to learn.  Remember knowledge is power, but you cannot replace real life practice with just reading it in a book so get out and get your hands dirty.

  1. Land Navigation:  I would break this down into two categories, GPS & Map and Compass.  GPS units can be extremely helpful and most units are user friendly but getting the most from your GPS unit takes skill.  Learn how to set waypoints, understand what GPS coordinates are, and if you have one, update the map programs as needed.  Even though GPS is great technology fails and if your luck is like mine it will fail when you need it most.  Buy a good Compass and get some area maps of wilderness locations that you frequent.  Learn to ready the topographic maps and understand how to plot courses.  This skill will be worth its weight in gold if you ever run out of batteries in your GPS or “Smart Phone”.
  2. Fire Starting:  I cannot stress it enough how important being able to start a fire is for survival.  Fire covers all spectrums of survival from signaling rescue, to protection from elements and predators, to water purification to food preparation.  It is also a psychological booster in a time of despair.  I like to practice different fire starting methods every time I use my BBQ grill.  I pay attention to my technique and the environmental conditions, especially when it does not work.  The last thing I want to do is use a method in a situation that is not optimal and waist valuable energy and time.
  3. Identifying Wild Edibles: Living off the land is the key to survival.  Knowing what nature has provided is a skill that has to be practiced and photos in a book do not always properly represent the vegetation in your area so get out and see it firsthand.  Knowing what is poisonous is also just as important.
  4. Make a Survival Kit: Investing in a survival kit is like buying car insurance, you hope you don’t need it but it’s better to have it and not need it, than not have it and wish you did.  Keep it small and light weight.  To do this, select items that are multifunctional and cover more than one of the priorities of Survival (Protection, Rescue, Water, and Fire).  In Previous Simple Steps we have covered some great suggestions for survival kit items.  It does not have to be expensive but it does have to be reliable.
  5. Health and Fitness: It is common knowledge that being physically fit will expand your chances of survival.  You are already taking a step in the right direction by being active, getting out and going on a hike.  Start small and make simple changes to your lifestyle.  A very simple three step rule to follow is to never go three days without exercise, workout at least three days a week, and never miss a Monday.  You will be amazed at how effective this is.
  6. Water Treatment and Purification: If you have not already, purchase a water purification system.  I love the Lifestraw, but there are many other systems out there as well.  I also carry a bulk water purification system and tablets.  I would also practice making water still and a rain catch as well.  Water is top priority and without it nothing else matters.
  7. Snares and Traps: Once you have established a water source food is important.  Hunting takes a lot of time and energy you may not have.  If you are alone, there are a lot of tasks that need to be completes so having passive systems set up to catch small game and fish while you attend to other needs is a great skill to know.  The more you can set the better your chances to bag a meal will be.
  8. First Aid: Wilderness first aid, CPR, and any other medical skill training you can get help you and anyone else you may come across.  Having a first aid kit is not enough.  You need to know how to use it.  Take a class from the Red Cross, or another accredited source. This is not a wilderness survival skill this is a LIFE survival skill.
  9. Shelter Building: Shelters keep you safe from the environmental conditions and predators alike.  Identifying shelters nature has provided and having the ability to use materials you find to improve upon those shelters will not only help you from expending unneeded energy but will help you preserve what energy you do have.  Practice making basic shelters that are time and energy efficient.
  10. Search and Rescue: Knowing how search and rescue works and searches will help you understand how to make yourself easier to find.  Having equipment on hand to help signal for help can shorten your time in the wild and raise your chances of survivability.  Getting things such as a whistle, signal mirror and flares are a must have if you want out as quickly as possible.
  11. Communications: Most people today have cell phones but they are not always reliable in backcountry areas.  Carrying a hand held radio or CB (Citizen Ban Radio) are a great asset. Most off road vehicle clubs and hiking clubs use these and by scanning you may be able to contact someone in your area for help.  It is also good to have in case your group gets separated to link back up again.
  12. Weather prediction: Knowing how to read cloud formations and environmental conditions is a great skill to help keep you using Mother Nature to help you survive.  Seeing when a storm may be near can help plain when to set up rain catches, take shelter, and when to make fire and which method would be best.  

I hope that this list shows you that there is a lot more to hiking in the back country than just lacing up some boots, throwing on a pack and taking off.  Plan to be at your best when things are at your worst.  See you on the trails.    “

What subjects are you most interested in? Tell us in the comments section below! We are always looking to provide the most pertinent and sought after information to our audiences. You can always get more Wes by liking his Facebook, viewing his YouTube or visiting his site. Until next month!

-Giddy-Up!!

Previous Steps

Floods Dehydration Halloween Edition Survival Kit Daylight Estimation

Determining Direction Eye Protection Nature Calling First Aid Kits

Epi-Pens Scorpions Edible Fruit Search and Rescue Clouds Traps Celestial Navigation

Footwear Communication Trick or Treating Fire

0 Comments »

Check it Out List: Tactical Clothing

Two words that have infiltrated the shooting world over the past years, tactical and zombie. From those two words, different worlds have been developed. And combining those words is a whole different ball game!

When it comes to the term tactical, there is a whole slew of things it can involve. Tactical shooting, clothing, maneuvering, reloading, pens, holsters, water bottles, knives, flashlights and so on. So much so that many simply mock the whole “tactical” concept.

But like many things that can come under ridicule, tactical apparel does have sound reasoning behind it. So for this month’s Check it Out List we are going to go over Tactical Clothing.

 

Tactical Shirt

Tactical Pants/Shorts

Tactical Belt

Tactical Gloves

Tactical Jacket

Tactical Boots

 

Most often tactical products are concerning self-defense. It goes hand in hand with possible combat and carrying a firearm. You really wouldn’t want to be caught in a gun-fight with pajama pants, flip flops and a lose shirt. You are going to want clothing that is secure, leaving little room for possible issues occurring while drawing and firing a firearm.

Working our way down the list, let us start with the shirt. There is an assortment of shirts: long sleeve, short sleeve, button up, polo and so on. Each different style will provide you with some kind of advantage. Also depending on the weather and possibly your job or plan for the day will help you choose what to wear.

The pants and shorts are well known for having numerous pockets on them. This is for your extra magazines, knife, flashlight, standard everyday items (phone, wallet, etc.) and more. Unlike cargo shorts, these pockets do not bulge out so you are less likely to get caught on something while moving. Also the pockets hold items more securely so you are not fishing around to find the desired item.

The belt may be the simplest yet most important aspect. First thing to notice is how thick it is. The thickness and height of the belt help keep a holster on your person. Try wearing a holster on a normal belt and notice how much wiggle there is. Now when you have to draw your firearm that wiggle space could throw you off and be a huge difference to the outcome. A tactical belt will almost eliminate that “wiggle room” completely.

Two items are more for personal preference. Gloves are great to shoot with, but not always necessary. And you probably won’t go around wearing them all day anyway so it would look a little unnatural. They do allow one to grip a firearm better and can help if dealing with a “hot” firearm. Gloves do not sweat like your hand might in a stressful situation so it helps keep something important from “slipping out”.

A nice tactical jacket will allow you to have numerous pockets (much like the pants/shorts) and may even have special pockets to carry extra magazines or the firearm itself. These jackets tend to be built well so they do a nice job of keeping you warm and providing you with ease of access for items.

You can tell a lot about someone by their shoes. Tactical boots are very nice and many who wear them tend to wear nothing else. These boots are built light, solid and comfortable. Thinking about having to be in a self-defense situation you are not going to want to worry about tripping on your shoelaces or even worse being in flip flops. There has been an increasing trend for use of tactical boots for hunting and hiking because of how well they work.

No matter what your goal is, hopefully this has opened your eyes or opinions to other options.

-Giddy-Up!!

Checked-Lists

Picnics

Gun Cleaning

Game Care

First Aid

Kayaking

Day Pack

Trip Prep

Range Time

Fishing Pack

Boating Day Trip

Camp Cooking

 Dove Hunting

Upland Hunting

0 Comments »

Fall Flannel Fest at Bass Pro Shop

Are you crazy about flannel?  What is it about flannel that makes us think about soft fire lit rooms in October?  The simple serenity of feeling warm and cozy.  Here in the Northeast, Fall is a beautiful time of year.  You can still camp, kayak, hike, and hunt.  It is the perfect time to wear flannel, which makes it the perfect time to stop on down to Bass Pro Shop and check out what we have in our flannel collection.

Flannel has been around since the 17th century when it was a popular fabric in Wales.  Well it is extremely popular right now.  Flannel just never seems to go out of style.  Right now you see women in their twenties sporting it with leggings and boots or flats. This is not just for men, lumberjacks or construction workers!  Lightweight, soft to the touch it leaves us warm but not weighed down.

Flannel is affordable.  Check out the shirts and pants below to see just how much flannel Bass Pro Shop has to offer!

Do you want the softest flannel shirt going?  You have to check out the Redhead Ultimate Flannel shirts.  Sizes small to 2xlt and 8 colors give you a wide selection to pick from.  Made of 100% combed yarn, these shirts resist pilling and are virtually shrink free.

The Redhead Flannel-Lined Rock Bluff Shirt is also made of 100% cotton (peached twill outside and plaid flannel in the body).  This shirt comes in four colors and has 100% polyester lining in the sleeves with a two button flap chest pockets.  Best part this shirt goes up to 3xl.

 

 

 

 

If you are looking for a mix of fleece and flannel check out the Redhead Fleece Lined Flannel.  This top comes in 4 colors and comes in sizes small to 3xl.  Fleece lined body and quilted lining in the sleeves gives you a little extra warmth.

Still can't find a color to suit you?  Check out the Redhead Bear Creek Flannel ShirtThis shirt comes in 12 different colors, 100% cotton and two chest pockets.  Sizes small to 2xlt.

 

 

 

 

 

The top half of you is warm now take a look at the pants. The Redhead Flannel Lined Bluff Cargo Pant has two hand as well as two cargo pockets that have hook and loop closures.  They are flannel lined with a 100% cotton twill exterior.   The Redhead Flannel Lined Utility Pant is light weight and warm and with the cotton flannel lining is tough and durable.

 

 

 

 

 

You say you love flannel but need something a little more dressed up?  Check out the Bob Timberlake Signature Flannel Shirt.  This 100% cotton shirt is soft to the touch while being more dressed up casual.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lets not forget the ladies.  The Natural Reflections Flannel Shirt Jacket has a two button flap chest pocket with princess seams and is made of 100% cotton with a sherpa lining.  Cozy and warm this jacket also comes in four colors.  Perfect for fall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not to be outdone is the Natural Reflections Flannel Shirt100% cotton flannel with two button chest pockets princess sleeves and it comes in eight colors.  Sizes small to 3x.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don't forget that we also have Natural Reflections Flannel Lined Jeans and Natural Reflections Flannel Lined Twill pants. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your body is set, now how about those feet?  Why we even have some flannel lined casual shoes and boots.  The Redhead All Season Classic Boots for mens and ladies is just what you need.  Rugged suede leather upper, flannel plaid lining, easy on or off.  Perfect for this kind of weather.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Casual is the word today. The Bob Timberlake Forest View is a casual comfortable shoe for relaxing and lounging.  With a cusioned insole and plaid fleece lining one might not ever want to take them off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last but not least, nights get a little cold here.  Whether you are camping or just sitting out at a fire pit.  The Bass Pro Shop Sleeping Bags with flannel inside will do the trick of blanket or sleeping bag.  From 0 degrees to 40 degrees, these affordable bags are perfect.  We even carry double, oversized or standard bags.

 

 

 

 

 

Whatever your flannel obsession is, Bass Pro Shop is where you need to be.  So stop on out to our Fall Flannel Fest and see the wide selection you have to warm those bones.

Robin Piedmonte

Events Coordinator

 

 

0 Comments »

Simple Steps with Wes: Footwear

So for this month I decided that Wes and I should “step it up”. I am hoping that by now you all are not hoping that we “put a sock in it”. And that’s about it for shoe puns right now.

We are going over basic footwear concepts for the outdoors. Wes has quite the extensive history of hiking. Military, search and rescue, recreational and more has lead him to have a good knowledge of this kind of thing. And he was in charge of our Footwear department here for a while!

“We get a lot of questions about picking the proper footwear for hiking.  It is a topic that has a lot of variables to consider.  First everyone is different.  There is no standardization within the shoe industry.  A size 9 is not always a size 9.

Aside possible injuries or special needs by the wearer (arch support etc..) I look at a few basic factors.  First it has to have a Vibram sole.  Vibram is a solid cleat that will be more durable over time.

Secondly the geometry of the cleat pattern should be broken up.  This allows for better traction and less potential to slip on loose surfaces.

Lastly you have to select the stiffness of the sole.  In order to maintain balance your foot will flex, then the ankle, then knee, then the lower back.  The more pack weight or rougher terrain the stiffer the sole needed to relieve the stress to the body.

I have two hiking boots types I use regularly.  Lighter hikes (under 12 miles with pack under 25lbs.) I wear the Merrell Moab pictured below.  Heavy hikes I wear the Danner Expeditions.  But like Ford vs Dodge vs Chevy, everyone will have their own preference.”

So there you have it. Another Simple Step and proof that Wes has a great “sole”!

Get more Wes at his site!

 

-Giddy-Up!!

 

Previous Simple Steps:

Floods

Dehydration

Halloween Edition

Survival Kit

Daylight Estimation

Determining Direction

Eye Protection

Nature Calling

First Aid Kits

Epi-Pens

Scorpions

Edible Fruit

Search and Rescue

Clouds

Traps

Celestial Navigation

0 Comments »

Walk a Mile in My Shoes

So many shoes! That’s what went through my head when I went to Bass Pro Shops Katy the other day. I couldn’t believe my eyes: there were so many choices to be had. All the associates were super friendly and attentively helpful, but I just wanted to take my time looking. There was a massive wall dedicated to shoes. There were other cases and shelves dedicated to specific footwear and the shelves were sometimes short and sometimes tall enough that I couldn’t see over the top of them. I could imagine all the different reason and scenarios that I’d need ALL the shoes for. Everyone needs to have shoes you know.

Most of the shoes were for outdoor stuff. There were boots, so many boots. I could just imagine hiking through the forest in RedHead® Talus II Waterproof Hiking Boots. They’re so well built. They’d support my ankle and give my foot a little cushion and a lot of grip for if I slip. They’re even waterproof! Then I got to thinking about getting my feet in water. I definitely don’t want to get my feet wet so I’d probably need a pair of RedHead® 800 Gram Thinsulate 16'' Side Zip Rubber Boots, they even zip on for easy wear! Or I could wear one of the many different styles of waders and wading boots Bass Pro Shops Katy had on display. Then again if I just want to protect my feet in water and don’t mind getting wet like at the river then I could wear the Aqua Sox or Crocs that they sell.

While that would all be good for fishing, I started to wonder about hunting: ‘tis the season. They had work boots and hunting boots galore, I turned around and everywhere I looked – there they were. There was rubber and snake boots and insulated and uninsulated boots for men, women, AND children. You wouldn’t believe how happy this made me. With the help of Bass Pro Shops I can take my whole family hunting and properly outfitted in RedHead® gear.

At that thought I decided I needed to do some shopping. They had lots of other shoes for lots of situations and occasions indoors and out, but I needed to get hunting gear: I’d forgotten that was why I’d come to Bass Pro Shops Katy! I do think you should come in and see what all they’ve got though. Everyone is sure to find something they like and at an amazing price!! I love Bass Pro Shops Katy. 

0 Comments »

The Cold Never Bothered Me Anyways!

With the weather cooling down it's always a good idea to throw some Hot Hands in your pockets, but did you know the other uses where these can come in handy? Events like late Football Games, Camping, Hiking, etc. I know in our local area it is popular to visit DollyWood in the winter and enjoy the lights, but it can definitely get cold fast when you're walking around the mountains for hours at night.

These are always something I bring along and throw in the toes of my boots and my winter coat pockets because they last for HOURS! In the camo department we sell a two pack (one for each hand, or foot) for $2.00 but the perfect time to find them, and when I always purchase mine, is now-when the bulk packs come out. They're $9.99 and you get twenty, which is perfect for me and my all-the-time-freezing self!

A lot of people who come into the store are reliant on these things and practically use them for every winter purpose you can imagine. Motorcycle rides, Cutting wood, walking the dog, hunting, or even taking a stroll through a "winter wonderland".

So what's the breakdown of these simple heat producing devices? The pouches are extremely thin and activated by air, or in other words, shake it! The friction causes a heat-creating reaction that lasts for about 10 hours. They're safe and easy to use, and can be snugly put about anywhere. You can see the bulk pack online with this link http://www.basspro.com/HeatMax-HotHands-SelfActivating-Hand-Warmer-Value-Pack/product/611600488/

In the camo department here in Sevierville, we even sell accessories that have pockets sewn into them specifically for hot hands use. There is a variety of items ranging from ear bands, to hats, to gloves, to neck gaitors, and even more and each has three colors to choose from; blaze orange, camo, and black. All having a fleece texture and warm,cozy feel.

Hot Hands come in both the single and bulk packs, as mentioned, but are also featured in a Cold Weather Pack and Footwear and boots pack specifically. The Cold Weather pack features an emergency space blanket which reflects up to 80% of body heat and can be seen here http://www.basspro.com/HotHands-Cold-Weather%a0Pack/product/13032006164421/

Make sure to stop by and see our awesome Hot Hands deals and accessories and don't let the cold get the better of you this winter!

 

0 Comments »

There's A Snake In My Boot!

Unless you're a cute animated toy from a Disney Movie, this is NOT something you want to be shouting in the middle of the woods. Snakes are everywhere you hunt, hike, or travel and can have quite the bite when not properly prepared. (There is no bark). Looking towards this fall, it is important to use the right protection when walking through tall grasses, forests, and leaf piles, to avoid snake bites. At Bass Pro we carry various lines of great snake protection. The two I will talk about is the ForEverLast Snake guard shields and chaps.

 

The ForEverLast Snake guard shields are one of our top sellers at our store for snake protection. They are knee length and are made with adjustable straps to fit any size leg. The chaps themselves are made of a tough 900d nylon composite shell and high density polycarbonate insert. These are $39.99 and exclusively printed in Realtree APG. You can find these items online here http://www.basspro.com/ForEverLast-Snake-Guard-Shields/product/12020205011219/

The second pair we carry from ForEverLast is the Snake Guard Chaps. These chaps are a lightweight canvas like material that protect from briars and bushes and snakes from the knee down. The snake protective portion is constructed of a firm nylon.  The chaps adjust around the calf and belt loop for a proper fit. These are featured in APG and are priced at $49.99. The link for the item on our website is http://www.basspro.com/ForEverLast-Snake-Guard-Chaps/product/1304260626449/

Make sure to check out our full line of snake protection products at Bass Pro ranging from chaps to full length boots in our footwear department.

"Snake in My Boot" Photo Credit @PhotoBlip.com

0 Comments »

Gear for Cave Exploring

Cave exploring is a guaranteed adventure for almost anyone. While exploring alone is attractive to some taking the whole family on a cave diving adventure is just as fun. Exploring a cathedral room or finding a hidden chamber deep underground is the kind of stuff stories are made of, and in the Ozarks caves are definitely not in short supply. But a cave exploring expedition can become treacherous if the right gear is not on hand to deal with situations that might arise along the way.

First thing any caver is going to need while underground is a good light source. This needs to be not only a steady source of directional light but also a solid design that can take a beating and will not need constant maintenance while in the cave. It is also a good idea to take a few forms of light for exploring underground. A headlamp is the first order of business. For the new caver a simple light that is rugged should be used. The Primos Top Gun LED Headlamp is a good starter headlamp because it has both high and low settings for while in the cave and an easily adjustable head strap to keep the light in place.

LED headlamp

After the headlamp a good idea would be to have a regular flashlight that can be stored in a pocket just in case the headlamp goes out. For this job the Bass Pro Shops® Mini LED Flashlight Combo - 6 Pack, because there are 6 lights in this pack it is easy to put one in a pocket, one in a backpack and hand one to each child in the cave exploring. Also these little lights are very bright and durable making them perfect for the cave!

BPS

Another light source that could be used in an absolute emergency would be a chemical light stick or glow stick. A good choice for glow stick would be the Texsport® Glo Lite Stix™, these glow sticks provide 6 hours of continual low light making them good for an emergency in a cave.

glo

The next stumbling block that many cavers will run into while exploring underground, will be dehydration. While the temperature in the cave might be cool and moist, the physical exertion of climbing over rocks and crawling through narrow passages does tend to cause sweating and dehydration. An easy way to avoid this would be to carry a hydration pack with at least a liter of water in it. This pack will need to be durable enough to make it through the cave without tearing a hole in it and keep the water drinkable for an extended period of time. A good pack for the job is the CamelBak® Rogue™ Hydration Pack, with a coated nylon outer casing this hydration pack is great for the scrapes and bumps a caver is going to run into while exploring. Another pack that is great for the job is the Bass Pro Shops® XPS® 1.5L Hydration Pack, this pack has a low profile and durable polyester coating making it perfect for climbing through tight spaces and over rough surfaces.

xpscamelbak

In a cave, regular clothing tends to be ripped to shreds on the limestone and gravel that is throughout. So finding the right clothes to cover softer underclothes is needed. Styles that tend to work well for the cave are the coveralls and bib overalls. What a caver should look for in coveralls and bib overalls is the durability and wear ability. If the coveralls are going to fall apart after crawling on knees for a few hundred yards then they are not going to be caving material. While at the same time if the overalls ride up or chafe when walking then they will definitely not be usable in the cramped spaces of a cave. Carhartt® Sandstone Bib Overalls are a great set that fits the bill for the rigors of crawling around a cave. The double ply knees make this pair great for being down and dirty while still remaining comfortable in tight situations.

carhartt

Now that the clothing is covered it is time for the boots that will be needed in the cave. These boots need to be tough and most certainly waterproof, while also having the traction needed for walking on the slick limestone and loose gravel of the local caves. A good pair of boots that fits the bill is the Columbia Woodburn Mid Waterproof Camo Hiking Boots. This pair of boots has a solid hard sole made for hiking over rough terrain, and is comfortable enough to wear on a long walk, making these boots great for being in a cave environment. Another good set of boots for this job is the RedHead® Osprey Hiking Boots. These waterproof boots have a good set of removable insoles that keep the feet comfortable while providing the support and stability needed for walking and crawling around in a cave environment.

Columbiaredhead

Now that the gear is gathered and clothing is ready to go it is time to head to the cave and go over a few tips and tricks for being in a cave. Before leaving for the cave, it is a good idea to let a friend or relative know the exact location of the cave that is going to be explored. Also tell them how long the trip will take and to contact the proper authorities if a certain amount of time has passes and they don’t get a confirmation that everyone is alright. Keeping a phone turned off in the car is a good idea, while taking a phone into the cave is also important, if more than one phone is available. Note that some phones are able to work well in certain caves so having a phone can come in handy. Keeping a small stock of chemical stick lights is a good way to assure that even if all electronic lights fail there will still be enough light to find a way out of the cave. Finally keeping a length of cord handy, so kids and adults have something to hold on to while walking and keep from getting split up from the group. Now that the gear and tips are dispensed it is finally time to go into the cave! As always happy hunting and good luck! 

0 Comments »

Hi-Ho A Camping We Will Go

Camping is something people from all walks of life can do. It can be a really cheap vacation, or it can be an expensive getaway. The experience all depends on how we do it; the real prize to be won is the memories made. If we’re ready to make some memories then let’s get ready to go!

The first thing we want to think about is what we want to do. Do we want to spend as little as possible and still have a good time or do we want to go glamping (this an excessively comfortable form of camping that we will discuss in a later article)? If money is no obstacle and we want to take the house with us then we want to go glamping. If we want to relax and deal with minimal extra and /or unnecessary stuff then we want to go a more traditional route. There’s nothing right or wrong about either of these choices, which can be intermingled at will, and we should always pick what we can afford both money wise and time/effort/ability wise. The point of this is always to make good, positive memories that we can share with others either in the moment or later on.

After we choose how we want to camp we can pick a location. The location will determine what gear we need. The other thing that determines what gear we need is weather. We should always check the weather as we plan for an outing because it can determine not only what gear we need but how long we want to stay. So we have picked a location, checked the weather, and decided how long we’re going to be gone. Let’s start thinking about what all to pack.

Packing can be easy or packing can be difficult. We’ve decided how and where we want to go camp, we’ve checked the weather, and hopefully in doing all that we’ve decided how long we want to go camping. All these things need to be decided first because they influence what all we need to take with us which in turn can decide how difficult a trip or easy our trip will be barring unforeseen experiences. 

Let’s create a scenario together. We’re going to go camping at Kelly’s Pond Campground for 3 days and it is supposed to be sunny all weekend. Now we all know that the weather can change on a dime and almost no one wants to go camping in the rain. To those who do: best of luck and fun in the rain! So, 3 days at Kelly’s Pond can be a relatively small trip or it can be a super busy weekend. Kelly’s Pond offers lots of stuff to do including: tent camping, hiking, fishing, hunting, if we want to we can ride our ATV if we have one or want to buy one, they even offer  picnic tables and fire rings so we can cook s’mores safely!

Now it’s time to plan what we’re going to take and where to get it if we don’t have it already. Suppose we want to go and have a fun filled week packed with adventure. Here’s what we want to do:

To do all that we need to run by our local Bass Pro Shops and get what we need. Now we’re being hypothetical so we’ll say we’re in Houston near the Katy, Tx Bass Pro Shops. Bass Pro Shops in Katy is great: it’ll have everything we need to go camping.

When we first walk in we can go to Customer Service to get our hunting and fishing licenses. Then we can go to the back right of the store from the entrance to get fishing gear and on our way back there we can get that ATV we’ve been wanting. After we get all the fishing gear we need we can head back towards the entrance to get any clothes we may not have and then we can head to the back of the store for a potty break since we’re human and we may or may not have little ones with us. After that we’ll already be standing in camping so we can get all the camping gear we’ll need: tent, cooking store, survival gear, and even a backpack to put it all in! Next to camping is camo so we can get camouflage for hunting and speaking of hunting the hunting department is right next to that on the way to the register so we can get guns, knives and ammo along with decoys and anything else we need to get that prize shot. We’re finally heading to the registers up front to check out and we’ll pass by the boot wall, what’s more important than proper footwear?Now, we should have everything we need besides food to make a memorable camping trip!!!

We can get to packing! Now we have all of our gear and licensing so we can go hunting and fishing. We got an Arctic Cat so we can use the ATV trails. We got clothes appropriate for the temperature and weather predicted. We want to pack everything as conservatively as possible so we don’t have a lot of extra to carry. We need to print a map of the grounds and a map of how to get to the grounds before we head out as well as food and any other supplies we may need.

By now everything should be researched, bought, packed, and printed. The vehicle should be loaded and everything is ready to go.

Let’s go have a great time!

0 Comments »

Ascend Rainwear to Uganda

Bass Pro Shops Altoona once again recently had the opportunity to assist the Des Moines Blank Park Zoo with a special partnership.

The Zoo supports the Chimpanzee Sanctuary and Wildlife Conservation Trust (CSWCT) and provides much needed everyday materials to its team of Ambassadors. These 27 people work tirelessly in the African rain forest, monitoring wild chimpanzee troops and other rare animals; protecting them from poaching and capture for the illegal pet trade. They also educate the local communities about preservation of the precious habitat and reforestation techniques.

Blank Park Zoo adopted this courageous team in 2012 and has provided donations of needed gear and equipment to ensure success of this program. things we often take for granted, everyday items like quality hiking boots, flashlights, rainwear, GPS units, and cameras are often unavailable and expensive in Uganda, so the Zoo collects them through donations and sends them to the team in Africa. 

Bass Pro Shop Altoona has been involved since the beginning, helping two years ago by assisting with a supply of waterproof RedHead boots for the workers. This year we contributed Ascend raingear at a discount. Each member of the team was outfitted with durable rain jackets and pants that will help them carry out their important work in the forest!

Bass Pro Shops Altoona

_________________

Like us @  Bass Pro Shops Altoona
Tweet us @bassproaltoona
Pin us @ pinterest.com/bpsaltoona
View us @ 
youtube.com/bassproshopsaltoona
0 Comments »

Which Waders are the Best Choice for Me?

Fishing can be an exciting outdoor activity, especially when the fish are biting! Those who bank fish may be at a disadvantage if the fish that are biting are in deeper water. A simple solution to this problem is fishing waders. Whether you’re fishing for Salmon, Trout or Bass, waders can give you a competitive edge.

It is important to pick the correct wader for the depth of the water you’ll be fishing as well as the weather you’re in. There are several types of waders to choose from. Chest waders are most versatile in their design, allowing fishermen to wade into deep water because they provide maximum coverage.  The suspenders and lightweight baggy material keeps the waders securely on your body while leaving room for your body and layered clothing.

Waist-high waders are mid height wader option. Waist waders don’t provide as much coverage as chest waders. Designed much like a baggy pair of pants, they are meant for water no deeper than mid-thigh and are equipped with belt loops to hold them in place. These waders are nice in that they provide more coverage than a hip wader, but don’t restrict movement as much as a chest wader would. These are a nice warm weather option because of their light weight, medium coverage design.

Hip waders are a minimal coverage option meant for water no higher than the knee. These are a great warm weather option due to their light weight. These are often used for fishing in shallow waters.

There are options for either insulated or uninsulated waders as well. Insulated waders are used for both colder water and colder weather. These often consist of baggy material to allow for layered clothing. Uninsulated waders are a great option for fishing in summer months as they are more breathable.

There are options for boot-foot waders, wading soles, and stocking foot bottomed waders. Boot-foot waders allow you to purchase both boot and wader in one, which make them convenient and affordable. Wading soles come in a variety of materials such as felt, rubber, hiking, and studded soles, for different underwater terrain. Stocking foot waders are meant to be paired with a waterproof wading boot. It is up to the fisherman which option is best suited for their preferred type of fishing.

Waders are meant to enhance your fishing experience while keeping you dry and comfortable, not hinder it. It is important to find the right wader for the conditions in which you’ll be fishing. It is also important to rinse (especially if you fish in salt or brackish water) and hang dry your waders after each use to insure they don’t mildew.  Make sure to store waders that are completely dry, in a cool, dry space free of direct sunlight.

0 Comments »